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Article

Applications of Photogrammetric Modeling to Roman Wall Painting: A Case Study in the House of Marcus Lucretius

Department of Informatics, Indiana University at Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
Received: 25 March 2019 / Revised: 4 June 2019 / Accepted: 5 June 2019 / Published: 10 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ancient Mediterranean Painting (vol. 2))
Across many sites in Italy today, wall paintings face particular dangers of damage and destruction. In Pompeii, many extant fragments are open to the air and accessible to tourists. While efforts are underway to preserve the precious few examples that have come down to us today, after excavation even new finds begin to decay from the moment they are exposed to the air. Digital photogrammetry has been used for the documentation, preservation, and reconstruction of archaeological sites, small objects, and sculpture. Photogrammetry is also well-suited to the illustration and reconstruction of Roman wall painting and Roman domestic interiors. Unlike traditional photography, photogrammetry can offer three-dimensional (3D) documentation that captures the seams, cracks, and warps in the structure of the wall. In the case of an entire room, it can also preserve the orientation and visual impression of multiple walls in situ. This paper discusses the results of several photogrammetric campaigns recently undertaken to document the material record in the House of Marcus Lucretius at Pompeii (IX, 3, 5.24). In the process, it explores the combination of visual analysis with digital tools, and the use of 3D models to represent complex relationships between spaces and objects. To conclude, future avenues for research will be discussed, including the creation of an online database that would facilitate visualizing further connections within the material record. View Full-Text
Keywords: digital humanities; photogrammetry; roman wall painting; roman archaeology; 3D modeling; digital visual analysis digital humanities; photogrammetry; roman wall painting; roman archaeology; 3D modeling; digital visual analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

McClinton, K.E. Applications of Photogrammetric Modeling to Roman Wall Painting: A Case Study in the House of Marcus Lucretius. Arts 2019, 8, 89. https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8030089

AMA Style

McClinton KE. Applications of Photogrammetric Modeling to Roman Wall Painting: A Case Study in the House of Marcus Lucretius. Arts. 2019; 8(3):89. https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8030089

Chicago/Turabian Style

McClinton, Kelly E. 2019. "Applications of Photogrammetric Modeling to Roman Wall Painting: A Case Study in the House of Marcus Lucretius" Arts 8, no. 3: 89. https://doi.org/10.3390/arts8030089

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