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Open AccessArticle

Fire Safety in Tall Timber Building: A BIM-Based Automated Code-Checking Approach

1
NSERC Industrial Research Chair on Ecoresponsible Wood Construction (CIRCERB), Forest and Wood Sciences Department, Université Laval, 2425 rue de la Terrasse, Quebec City, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
2
Department of Construction Engineering, École de Technologie Supérieure, Montréal, QC H3C 1K3, Canada
3
FPInnovations, Quebec City, QC G1V 4C7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Buildings 2020, 10(7), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10070121
Received: 11 May 2020 / Revised: 18 June 2020 / Accepted: 1 July 2020 / Published: 8 July 2020
Fire safety regulations impose very strict requirements on building design, especially for buildings built with combustible materials. It is believed that it is possible to improve the management of these regulations with a better integration of fire protection aspects in the building information modeling (BIM) approach. A new BIM-based domain is emerging, the automated code checking, with its growing number of dedicated approaches. However, only very few of these works have been dedicated to managing the compliance to fire safety regulations in timber buildings. In this paper, the applicability to fire safety in the Canadian context is studied by constituting and executing a complete method from the regulations text through code-checking construction to result analysis. A design science approach is used to propose a code-checking method with a detailed analysis of the National Building Code of Canada (NBCC) in order to obtain the required information. The method starts by retrieving information from the regulation text, leading to a compliance check of an architectural building model. Then, the method is tested on a set of fire safety regulations and validated on a building model from a real project. The selected fire safety rules set a solid basis for further development of checking rules for the field of fire safety. This study shows that the main challenges for rule checking are the modeling standards and the elements’ required levels of detail. The implementation of the method was successful for geometrical as well as non-geometrical requirements, although further work is needed for more advanced geometrical studies, such as sprinkler or fire dampers positioning. View Full-Text
Keywords: BIM; fire safety; compliance checking; building code; visual programming BIM; fire safety; compliance checking; building code; visual programming
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kincelova, K.; Boton, C.; Blanchet, P.; Dagenais, C. Fire Safety in Tall Timber Building: A BIM-Based Automated Code-Checking Approach. Buildings 2020, 10, 121.

AMA Style

Kincelova K, Boton C, Blanchet P, Dagenais C. Fire Safety in Tall Timber Building: A BIM-Based Automated Code-Checking Approach. Buildings. 2020; 10(7):121.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kincelova, Kristina; Boton, Conrad; Blanchet, Pierre; Dagenais, Christian. 2020. "Fire Safety in Tall Timber Building: A BIM-Based Automated Code-Checking Approach" Buildings 10, no. 7: 121.

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