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Integration of Simulation Driven DfAM and LCC Analysis for Decision Making in L-PBF

1
Research Group of Laser Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, LUT School of Engineering Science, LUT University, FI-53851 Lappeenranta, Finland
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Turku, FI-20014 Turku, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2020, 10(9), 1179; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10091179
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 14 August 2020 / Accepted: 27 August 2020 / Published: 2 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Additive Manufacturing of Metals with Lasers)
Laser based powder bed fusion (L-PBF) is used to manufacture parts layer by layer with the energy of laser beam. The use of L-PBF for building functional parts originates from the design freedom, flexibility, customizability, and energy efficiency of products applied in dynamic application fields such as aerospace and automotive. There are challenges and drawbacks that need to be defined and overcome before its adaptation next to rivaling traditional manufacturing methods. Factors such as high cost of L-PBF machines, metal powder, post-preprocessing, and low productivity may deter its acceptance as a mainstream manufacturing technique. Understanding the key cost drivers of L-PBF that influence productivity throughout the whole lifespan of products will facilitate the decision-making process. Functional and operational decisions can yield profitability and increase competitiveness among advanced manufacturing sectors. Identifying the relationships between the phases of the life cycle of products influences cost-effectiveness. The aim of the study is to investigate the life cycle cost (LCC) and the impact of design to it in additive manufacturing (AM) with L-PBF. The article provides a review of simulation driven design for additive manufacturing (simulation driven DfAM) and LCC for metallic L-PBF processes and examines the state of the art to outline the merits, demerits, design rules, and life cycle models of L-PBF. Practical case studies of L-PBF are discussed and analysis of the interrelating factors of the different life phases are presented. This study shows that simulation driven DfAM in the design phase increases the productivity throughout the whole production and life span of L-PBF parts. The LCC model covers the whole holistic lifecycle engineering of products and offers guidelines for decision making. View Full-Text
Keywords: design for additive manufacturing; life cycle cost; metal; laser powder bed fusion; productivity design for additive manufacturing; life cycle cost; metal; laser powder bed fusion; productivity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nyamekye, P.; Unt, A.; Salminen, A.; Piili, H. Integration of Simulation Driven DfAM and LCC Analysis for Decision Making in L-PBF. Metals 2020, 10, 1179. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10091179

AMA Style

Nyamekye P, Unt A, Salminen A, Piili H. Integration of Simulation Driven DfAM and LCC Analysis for Decision Making in L-PBF. Metals. 2020; 10(9):1179. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10091179

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nyamekye, Patricia, Anna Unt, Antti Salminen, and Heidi Piili. 2020. "Integration of Simulation Driven DfAM and LCC Analysis for Decision Making in L-PBF" Metals 10, no. 9: 1179. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10091179

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