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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Residual Stress and Microstructure of a Ti-6Al-4V Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing Hybrid Demonstrator

1
Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und–prüfung (Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), 12205 Berlin, Germany
2
Chair of Mechanical Design and Manufacturing, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg, D-03046 Cottbus, Germany
3
Advanced Manufacturing, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
4
Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, 14476 Potsdam, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2020, 10(6), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060701
Received: 9 April 2020 / Revised: 15 May 2020 / Accepted: 23 May 2020 / Published: 26 May 2020
Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) features high deposition rates and, thus, allows production of large components that are relevant for aerospace applications. However, a lot of aerospace parts are currently produced by forging or machining alone to ensure fast production and to obtain good mechanical properties; the use of these conventional process routes causes high tooling and material costs. A hybrid approach (a combination of forging and WAAM) allows making production more efficient. In this fashion, further structural or functional features can be built in any direction without using additional tools for every part. By using a combination of forging basic geometries with one tool set and adding the functional features by means of WAAM, the tool costs and material waste can be reduced compared to either completely forged or machined parts. One of the factors influencing the structural integrity of additively manufactured parts are (high) residual stresses, generated during the build process. In this study, the triaxial residual stress profiles in a hybrid WAAM part are reported, as determined by neutron diffraction. The analysis is complemented by microstructural investigations, showing a gradient of microstructure (shape and size of grains) along the part height. The highest residual stresses were found in the transition zone (between WAAM and forged part). The total stress range showed to be lower than expected for WAAM components. This could be explained by the thermal history of the component. View Full-Text
Keywords: residual stress; WAAM; Ti-6Al-4V; additive manufacturing; neutron diffraction; hybrid manufacturing residual stress; WAAM; Ti-6Al-4V; additive manufacturing; neutron diffraction; hybrid manufacturing
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Mishurova, T.; Sydow, B.; Thiede, T.; Sizova, I.; Ulbricht, A.; Bambach, M.; Bruno, G. Residual Stress and Microstructure of a Ti-6Al-4V Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing Hybrid Demonstrator. Metals 2020, 10, 701.

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