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Review

WO3 and Ionic Liquids: A Synergic Pair for Pollutant Gas Sensing and Desulfurization

1
Dept. STEBICEF, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Build. 17, 90128 Palermo, Italy
2
Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Energy Technology Department, Casaccia Research Center, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome, Italy
3
Dept. Fundamental and Applied Sciences for Engineering (SBAI), Sapienza University of Rome, via Castro Laurenziano, 7, 00161 Rome, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2020, 10(4), 475; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10040475
Received: 9 March 2020 / Revised: 2 April 2020 / Accepted: 2 April 2020 / Published: 4 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Oxides)
This review deals with the notable results obtained by the synergy between ionic liquids (ILs) and WO3 in the field of pollutant gas sensing and sulfur removal pretreatment of fuels. Starting from the known characteristics of tungsten trioxide as catalytic material, many authors have proposed the use of ionic liquids in order to both direct WO3 production towards controllable nanostructures (nanorods, nanospheres, etc.) and to modify the metal oxide structure (incorporating ILs) in order to increase the gas adsorption ability and, thus, the catalytic efficiency. Moreover, ionic liquids are able to highly disperse WO3 in composites, thus enhancing the contact surface and the catalytic ability of WO3 in both hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of liquid fuels. In particular, the use of ILs in composite synthesis can direct the hydrogenation process (HDS) towards sulfur compounds rather than towards olefins, thus preserving the octane number of the fuel while highly reducing the sulfur content and, thus, the possibility of air pollution with sulfur oxides. A similar performance enhancement was obtained in ODS, where the high dispersion of WO3 (due to the use of ILs during the synthesis) allows for noteworthy results at very low temperatures (50 °C). View Full-Text
Keywords: WO3; ionic liquids; gas sensor; pollutant gases; desulfurization WO3; ionic liquids; gas sensor; pollutant gases; desulfurization
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MDPI and ACS Style

D’Anna, F.; Grilli, M.L.; Petrucci, R.; Feroci, M. WO3 and Ionic Liquids: A Synergic Pair for Pollutant Gas Sensing and Desulfurization. Metals 2020, 10, 475. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10040475

AMA Style

D’Anna F, Grilli ML, Petrucci R, Feroci M. WO3 and Ionic Liquids: A Synergic Pair for Pollutant Gas Sensing and Desulfurization. Metals. 2020; 10(4):475. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10040475

Chicago/Turabian Style

D’Anna, Francesca, Maria L. Grilli, Rita Petrucci, and Marta Feroci. 2020. "WO3 and Ionic Liquids: A Synergic Pair for Pollutant Gas Sensing and Desulfurization" Metals 10, no. 4: 475. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10040475

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