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Prediction of Leidenfrost Temperature in Spray Cooling for Continuous Casting and Heat Treatment Processes

1
Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Laboratory, Brno University of Technology, 61669 Brno, Czech Republic
2
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School of Engineering for Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281, USA
3
Department of Power Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Košice, 04200 Košice, Slovakia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2020, 10(11), 1551; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10111551
Received: 9 October 2020 / Revised: 5 November 2020 / Accepted: 16 November 2020 / Published: 22 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Metal Casting, Forming and Heat Treatment)
Spray cooling of hot steel surfaces is an inherent part of continuous casting and heat treatment. When we consider the temperature interval between room temperature and for instance 1000 °C, different boiling regimes can be observed. Spray cooling intensity rapidly changes with the surface temperature. Secondary cooling in continuous casting starts when the surface temperature is well above a thousand degrees Celsius and a film boiling regime can be observed. The cooled surface is protected from the direct impact of droplets by the vapour layer. As the surface temperature decreases, the vapour layer is less stable and for certain temperatures the vapour layer collapses, droplets reach the hot surface and heat flux suddenly jumps enormously. It is obvious that the described effect has a great effect on control of cooling. The surface temperature which indicates the sudden change in the cooling intensity is the Leidenfrost temperature. The Leidenfrost temperature in spray cooling can occur anywhere between 150 °C and over 1000 °C and depends on the character of the spray. This paper presents an experimental study and shows function for prediction of the Leidenfrost temperature based on spray parameters. Water impingement density was found to be the most important parameter. This parameter must be combined with information about droplet size and velocity to produce a good prediction of the Leidenfrost temperature. View Full-Text
Keywords: spray cooling; Leidenfrost temperature; continuous casting; heat treatment; mist cooling; experimental spray cooling; Leidenfrost temperature; continuous casting; heat treatment; mist cooling; experimental
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hnizdil, M.; Kominek, J.; Lee, T.-W.; Raudensky, M.; Carnogurska, M.; Chabicovsky, M. Prediction of Leidenfrost Temperature in Spray Cooling for Continuous Casting and Heat Treatment Processes. Metals 2020, 10, 1551. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10111551

AMA Style

Hnizdil M, Kominek J, Lee T-W, Raudensky M, Carnogurska M, Chabicovsky M. Prediction of Leidenfrost Temperature in Spray Cooling for Continuous Casting and Heat Treatment Processes. Metals. 2020; 10(11):1551. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10111551

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hnizdil, Milan, Jan Kominek, Tae-Woo Lee, Miroslav Raudensky, Maria Carnogurska, and Martin Chabicovsky. 2020. "Prediction of Leidenfrost Temperature in Spray Cooling for Continuous Casting and Heat Treatment Processes" Metals 10, no. 11: 1551. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10111551

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