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Article

Libraries Fight Disinformation: An Analysis of Online Practices to Help Users’ Generations in Spotting Fake News

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Communication and Education Department, Universidad Loyola Andalucía, 41704 Dos Hermanas, Spain
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Library Coordination, Universidad Loyola Andalucía, 41704 Dos Hermanas, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Eugène Loos and Loredana Ivan
Societies 2021, 11(4), 133; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11040133
Received: 1 October 2021 / Revised: 25 October 2021 / Accepted: 28 October 2021 / Published: 1 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fighting Fake News: A Generational Approach)
The work of libraries during the COVID-19 pandemic, as facilitators of reliable information on health issues, has shown that these entities can play an active role as verification agents in the fight against disinformation (false information that is intended to mislead), focusing on media and informational literacy. To help citizens, these entities have developed a wide range of actions that range from online seminars, to learning how to evaluate the quality of a source, to video tutorials or the creation of repositories with resources of various natures. To identify the most common media literacy practices in the face of fake news (news that conveys or incorporates false, fabricated, or deliberately misleading information), this exploratory study designed an ad hoc analysis sheet, validated by the inter-judge method, which allowed one to classify the practices of N = 216 libraries from all over the world. The results reveal that the libraries most involved in this task are those belonging to public universities. Among the actions carried out to counteract misinformation, open-access materials that favor self-learning stand out. These resources, aimed primarily at university students and adults in general, are aimed at acquiring skills related to fact-checking and critical thinking. Therefore, libraries vindicate their role as components of the literacy triad, together with professors and communication professionals. View Full-Text
Keywords: libraries; librarians; disinformation; fake news; literacy practices; open-access resources libraries; librarians; disinformation; fake news; literacy practices; open-access resources
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MDPI and ACS Style

Herrero-Diz, P.; López-Rufino, C. Libraries Fight Disinformation: An Analysis of Online Practices to Help Users’ Generations in Spotting Fake News. Societies 2021, 11, 133. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11040133

AMA Style

Herrero-Diz P, López-Rufino C. Libraries Fight Disinformation: An Analysis of Online Practices to Help Users’ Generations in Spotting Fake News. Societies. 2021; 11(4):133. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11040133

Chicago/Turabian Style

Herrero-Diz, Paula, and Clara López-Rufino. 2021. "Libraries Fight Disinformation: An Analysis of Online Practices to Help Users’ Generations in Spotting Fake News" Societies 11, no. 4: 133. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11040133

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