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Article

“Is It Overtraining or Just Work Ethic?”: Coaches’ Perceptions of Overtraining in High-Performance Strength Sports

Department of Sport and Physical Activity, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S10 2BP, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Gerasimos Terzis
Sports 2021, 9(6), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9060085
Received: 13 May 2021 / Revised: 2 June 2021 / Accepted: 3 June 2021 / Published: 7 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Resistance Training)
Optimal physical performance is achieved through the careful manipulation of training and recovery. Short-term increases in training demand can induce functional overreaching (FOR) that can lead to improved physical capabilities, whereas nonfunctional overreaching (NFOR) or the overtraining syndrome (OTS) occur when high training-demand is applied for extensive periods with limited recovery. To date, little is known about the OTS in strength sports, particularly from the perspective of the strength sport coach. Fourteen high-performance strength sport coaches from a range of strength sports (weightlifting; n = 5, powerlifting; n = 4, sprinting; n = 2, throws; n = 2, jumps; n = 1) participated in semistructured interviews (mean duration 57; SD = 10 min) to discuss their experiences of the OTS. Reflexive thematic analysis resulted in the identification of four higher order themes: definitions, symptoms, recovery and experiences and observations. Additional subthemes were created to facilitate organisation and presentation of data, and to aid both cohesiveness of reporting and publicising of results. Participants provided varied and sometimes dichotomous perceptions of the OTS and proposed a multifactorial profile of diagnostic symptoms. Prevalence of OTS within strength sports was considered low, with the majority of participants not observing or experiencing long-term reductions in performance with their athletes. View Full-Text
Keywords: overtraining syndrome; overreaching; functional overreaching; strength training; resistance training overtraining syndrome; overreaching; functional overreaching; strength training; resistance training
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bell, L.; Ruddock, A.; Maden-Wilkinson, T.; Hembrough, D.; Rogerson, D. “Is It Overtraining or Just Work Ethic?”: Coaches’ Perceptions of Overtraining in High-Performance Strength Sports. Sports 2021, 9, 85. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9060085

AMA Style

Bell L, Ruddock A, Maden-Wilkinson T, Hembrough D, Rogerson D. “Is It Overtraining or Just Work Ethic?”: Coaches’ Perceptions of Overtraining in High-Performance Strength Sports. Sports. 2021; 9(6):85. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9060085

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bell, Lee, Alan Ruddock, Tom Maden-Wilkinson, Dave Hembrough, and David Rogerson. 2021. "“Is It Overtraining or Just Work Ethic?”: Coaches’ Perceptions of Overtraining in High-Performance Strength Sports" Sports 9, no. 6: 85. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports9060085

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