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Article

A Thirty-Five-Minute Nap Improves Performance and Attention in the 5-m Shuttle Run Test during and outside Ramadan Observance

1
“Physical Activity, Sport and Health” Research Unit, UR18JS01, National Sport Observatory, Tunis 1003, Tunisia
2
High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Sfax, University of Sfax, Sfax 3000, Tunisia
3
Research Laboratory: Education, Motricity, Sport and Health, EM2S, LR19JS01, High Institute of Sport and Physical Education of Sfax, University of Sfax, Sfax 3000, Tunisia
4
Institute of Sport Science, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg, Germany
5
Department of Health, Exercise Science Research Center Human Performance and Recreation, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
6
Neurotrack Technologies, 399 Bradford St. Redwood City, CA 94063, USA
7
Department of Medicine, Clinical Excellence Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
8
Neurophysiopathology Unit, Foundation IRCCS Carlo Besta Neurological Institute, 20133 Milan, Italy
9
Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
10
Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), Postgraduate School of Public Health, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
11
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Laboratory for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (LIAM), York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Sports 2020, 8(7), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8070098
Received: 27 May 2020 / Revised: 29 June 2020 / Accepted: 6 July 2020 / Published: 11 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychophysiological Response in Sports)
Ramadan observance is characterized by several changes in behaviors, such as food and sleep, which could affect physical and cognitive performance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a 35-min nap (N35) opportunity on physical performance during the 5-m shuttle run test (5mSRT); attention; feelings; mood states; and perceptual measures of stress, fatigue, and muscle soreness during Ramadan observance. Fourteen physically active men (22 ± 3 years, 177 ± 4 cm, 76 ± 5 kg) were tested after a no-nap condition (N0), N35 15 days before Ramadan (BR), the last 10 days of Ramadan (DR), and 20 days after Ramadan (AR). Measures included the digit cancellation test (attention estimation), the profile of mood state (POMS), and the Hooper questionnaires. After a 5-min standard warm-up, participants performed the 5mSRT (6 × 30 s with 35 s in between; best distance (BD), total distance (TD), and fatigue index (FI) were recorded), along with the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) after each test repetition. After the 5mSRT test, participants responded to the feeling scale (FS). The results showed that TD and FI during the 5mSRT were not affected by Ramadan observance. However, BD was significantly lower than DR compared to AR after N0 (∆ = −4.3 ± 1.3%; p < 0.01) and N35 (∆ = −2.6 ± 1.0%; p < 0.05). After N0, attention decreased significantly at DR in comparison with BR (p < 0.05) and AR (p < 0.001). BD and TD improved after N35 compared to N0 at BR (∆ = +4.4 ± 2.1%, p < 0.05 for BD and ∆ = +4.8 ± 1.6%, p < 0.01 for TD), DR (∆ = +7.1 ± 2.2%, p < 0.05 for BD and ∆ = +5.1 ± 1.6%, p < 0.01 for TD), and AR (∆ = +5.5 ± 1.5%, p < 0.01 for BD and ∆ = +5.2 ± 1.2%, p < 0.001 for TD). A significant increase in attention was observed after N35 in comparison with N0 at DR (p < 0.01) and AR (p < 0.01). However, no changes were found for the perception of mood states, stress, sleep, muscle soreness, and the FI during the 5mSRT. Also, N35 was better than N0 for RPE at DR (p < 0.05), feelings at AR (p < 0.05), and fatigue estimation at AR (p < 0.01). A 35-min nap opportunity may have beneficial effects on physical and cognitive performances before, during, and after Ramadan. View Full-Text
Keywords: performance; exercise; fasting; psychological; siesta performance; exercise; fasting; psychological; siesta
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hsouna, H.; Boukhris, O.; Trabelsi, K.; Abdessalem, R.; Ammar, A.; Glenn, J.M.; Bott, N.; Souissi, N.; Lanteri, P.; Garbarino, S.; Bragazzi, N.L.; Chtourou, H. A Thirty-Five-Minute Nap Improves Performance and Attention in the 5-m Shuttle Run Test during and outside Ramadan Observance. Sports 2020, 8, 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8070098

AMA Style

Hsouna H, Boukhris O, Trabelsi K, Abdessalem R, Ammar A, Glenn JM, Bott N, Souissi N, Lanteri P, Garbarino S, Bragazzi NL, Chtourou H. A Thirty-Five-Minute Nap Improves Performance and Attention in the 5-m Shuttle Run Test during and outside Ramadan Observance. Sports. 2020; 8(7):98. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8070098

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hsouna, Hsen, Omar Boukhris, Khaled Trabelsi, Raouf Abdessalem, Achraf Ammar, Jordan M. Glenn, Nick Bott, Nizar Souissi, Paola Lanteri, Sergio Garbarino, Nicola L. Bragazzi, and Hamdi Chtourou. 2020. "A Thirty-Five-Minute Nap Improves Performance and Attention in the 5-m Shuttle Run Test during and outside Ramadan Observance" Sports 8, no. 7: 98. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8070098

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