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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

The Effects of Strength and Conditioning in Physical Education on Athletic Motor Skill Competencies and Psychological Attributes of Secondary School Children: A Pilot Study

1
Youth Physical Development Centre, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cyncoed Campus, Cardiff CF23 6XB, Wales, UK
2
Welsh Institute of Performance Science, Sport Wales, Sophia Gardens, Cardiff CF11 9SW, Wales, UK
3
Sports Performance Research Institute, New Zealand (SPRINZ), AUT University, Auckland 0632, New Zealand
4
Centre for Sport Science and Human Performance, Waikato Institute of Technology, Hamilton 3200, New Zealand
5
School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Swansea University, Fabian Way, Swansea SA1 8EN, Wales, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2020, 8(10), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8100138
Received: 30 June 2020 / Revised: 30 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 October 2020 / Published: 17 October 2020
Leading global physical activity guidelines advocate that young children need to engage in activities that strengthen musculoskeletal tissues and improve movement skill competency. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of delivering strength and conditioning as part of the physical education curriculum on athletic motor skill competencies (AMSC), physical performance, and psychosocial factors. Forty-six school children aged 11–14 were included in the study, and sub-divided firstly by sex and then into intervention and control groups. Intervention groups received nine lessons of strength and conditioning based activities over a six-week period, while the control groups continued with traditional physical education curricula. The resistance training skills battery (RTSB) and tuck jump assessment (TJA) assessed AMSC. Standing long jump distance assessed lower limb strength, and online surveys examined motivation, physical self-efficacy and self-esteem. Male and female intervention groups significantly improved RTSB (p > 0.05) whereas no changes were observed in the control groups. No changes were observed in the intervention groups TJA and only trivial and small non-significant changes in standing long jump performance. Significant increases in motivation of the male intervention group occurred. Strength and conditioning integrated in physical education can improve AMSC in short-term interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical literacy; physical training; children; intervention; physical activity physical literacy; physical training; children; intervention; physical activity
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Pullen, B.J.; Oliver, J.L.; Lloyd, R.S.; Knight, C.J. The Effects of Strength and Conditioning in Physical Education on Athletic Motor Skill Competencies and Psychological Attributes of Secondary School Children: A Pilot Study. Sports 2020, 8, 138.

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