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Rethinking Tourist Wellbeing through the Concept of Slow Adventure

Centre for Recreation and Tourism Research, West Highland College UHI, Carmichael Way, Fort William PH33 6FF, UK
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Sports 2019, 7(8), 190; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7080190
Received: 30 March 2019 / Revised: 14 July 2019 / Accepted: 18 July 2019 / Published: 8 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health and Wellbeing in an Outdoor and Adventure Sports Context)
The necessity for humans inhabiting the 21st century to slow down and take time to carry out daily practices frames the discourse of this research note. We suggest reconceptualising tourist wellbeing through the concept of slow adventure, as a response to the cult of speed and as a vehicle for engaging in deep, immersive and more meaningful experiences during journeys in the outdoors. We suggest that slow adventure has the potential to improve people’s general health and wellbeing through mindful enjoyment and consumption of the outdoor experience and thus bring people back to a state of mental and physical equilibrium. In so doing, we argue that extending the concept to include discussions around the psychological and social aspects of slow adventure is needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: slow adventure; time; slowness; wellbeing slow adventure; time; slowness; wellbeing
MDPI and ACS Style

Farkić, J.; Taylor, S. Rethinking Tourist Wellbeing through the Concept of Slow Adventure. Sports 2019, 7, 190.

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