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Review

A Brief Review on Concurrent Training: From Laboratory to the Field

Sports Performance Laboratory, School of Physical Education & Sports Science, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Ethnikis Antistassis 41, Daphne, 172 37 Athens, Greece
Sports 2018, 6(4), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040127
Received: 8 September 2018 / Revised: 14 October 2018 / Accepted: 17 October 2018 / Published: 24 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiological Responses During Exercise)
The majority of sports rely on concurrent training (CT; e.g., the simultaneous training of strength and endurance). However, a phenomenon called “Concurrent training effect” (CTE), which is a compromise in adaptation resulting from concurrent training, appears to be mostly affected by the interference of the molecular pathways of the underlying adaptations from each type of training segments. Until now, it seems that the volume, intensity, type, frequency of endurance training, as well as the training history and background strongly affect the CTE. High volume, moderate, continuous and frequent endurance training, are thought to negatively affect the resistance training-induced adaptations, probably by inhibition of the Protein kinase B—mammalian target of rapamycin pathway activation, of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In contrast, it seems that short bouts of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) or sprint interval training (SIT) minimize the negative effects of concurrent training. This is particularly the case when HIIT and SIT incorporated in cycling have even lower or even no negative effects, while they provide at least the same metabolic adaptations, probably through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC-1a) pathway. However, significant questions about the molecular events underlying the CTE remain unanswered. View Full-Text
Keywords: concurrent exercise; mammalian target of rapamycin; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator; adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase concurrent exercise; mammalian target of rapamycin; peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator; adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase
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MDPI and ACS Style

Methenitis, S. A Brief Review on Concurrent Training: From Laboratory to the Field. Sports 2018, 6, 127. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040127

AMA Style

Methenitis S. A Brief Review on Concurrent Training: From Laboratory to the Field. Sports. 2018; 6(4):127. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040127

Chicago/Turabian Style

Methenitis, Spyridon. 2018. "A Brief Review on Concurrent Training: From Laboratory to the Field" Sports 6, no. 4: 127. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040127

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