Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Temporal Variation in Genetic Composition of Migratory Helicoverpa Zea in Peripheral Populations
Previous Article in Journal
Identification and Expression of Inward-Rectifying Potassium Channel Subunits in Plutella xylostella
Previous Article in Special Issue
Genetic Diversity in Invasive Populations of Argentine Stem Weevil Associated with Adaptation to Biocontrol
Review

Insights from Population Genomics to Enhance and Sustain Biological Control of Insect Pests

1
Department of Biological Sciences, California State University San Marcos, San Marcos, CA 92096, USA
2
Department of Ecology, Evolution, & Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010, USA
3
Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State University, Hickory Corners, MI 49060, USA
4
Department of Biology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA
5
Department of Entomology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2020, 11(8), 462; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11080462
Received: 18 June 2020 / Revised: 15 July 2020 / Accepted: 17 July 2020 / Published: 22 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Population Genetics of Insects)
Biological control—the use of organisms (e.g., nematodes, arthropods, bacteria, fungi, viruses) for the suppression of insect pest species—is a well-established, ecologically sound and economically profitable tactic for crop protection. This approach has served as a sustainable solution for many insect pest problems for over a century in North America. However, all pest management tactics have associated risks. Specifically, the ecological non-target effects of biological control have been examined in numerous systems. In contrast, the need to understand the short- and long-term evolutionary consequences of human-mediated manipulation of biological control organisms for importation, augmentation and conservation biological control has only recently been acknowledged. Particularly, population genomics presents exceptional opportunities to study adaptive evolution and invasiveness of pests and biological control organisms. Population genomics also provides insights into (1) long-term biological consequences of releases, (2) the ecological success and sustainability of this pest management tactic and (3) non-target effects on native species, populations and ecosystems. Recent advances in genomic sequencing technology and model-based statistical methods to analyze population-scale genomic data provide a much needed impetus for biological control programs to benefit by incorporating a consideration of evolutionary consequences. Here, we review current technology and methods in population genomics and their applications to biological control and include basic guidelines for biological control researchers for implementing genomic technology and statistical modeling. View Full-Text
Keywords: population genomics; biological control; demographic models; pest management population genomics; biological control; demographic models; pest management
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Sethuraman, A.; Janzen, F.J.; Weisrock, D.W.; Obrycki, J.J. Insights from Population Genomics to Enhance and Sustain Biological Control of Insect Pests. Insects 2020, 11, 462. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11080462

AMA Style

Sethuraman A, Janzen FJ, Weisrock DW, Obrycki JJ. Insights from Population Genomics to Enhance and Sustain Biological Control of Insect Pests. Insects. 2020; 11(8):462. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11080462

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sethuraman, Arun, Fredric J. Janzen, David W. Weisrock, and John J. Obrycki 2020. "Insights from Population Genomics to Enhance and Sustain Biological Control of Insect Pests" Insects 11, no. 8: 462. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11080462

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop