Next Article in Journal
Biological Traits of the Pincer Wasp Gonatopus flavifemur (Esaki & Hashimoto) Associated with Different Stages of Its Host, the Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål)
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluation of the Potential of Fungal Biopesticides for the Biological Control of the Seed Bug, Elasmolomus pallens (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Rhyparochromidae)
Open AccessArticle

Thermal Tolerance of Fruit-Feeding Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Contrasting Mountaintop Environments

1
Programa de Pós-graduação em Ecologia de Biomas Tropicais, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais 35400-000, Brazil
2
Departamento de Biodiversidade, Evolução e Meio Ambiente, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais 35400-000, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2020, 11(5), 278; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11050278
Received: 1 April 2020 / Revised: 19 April 2020 / Accepted: 26 April 2020 / Published: 1 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insects in Mountain Ecosystems)
Ectothermic organisms, such as insects, are highly temperature dependent and are good models for studies that predict organisms’ responses to global climate change. Predicting how climate change may affect species distributions is a complicated task. However, it is possible to estimate species’ physiological constraints through maximum critical temperature, which may indicate if the species can tolerate new climates. Butterflies are useful organisms for studies of thermal tolerance. We tested if species have different thermal tolerances and if different habitats influence the thermal tolerance of the butterflies present in Brazil’s campo rupestre (open areas) and forest islands (shaded areas). A total of 394 fruit-feeding butterflies, comprising 45 species, were tested. The results separated the species into two statistically different groups: the resistant species with maximum critical temperature of 53.8 ± 7.4 °C, and the non-resistant species with maximum critical temperature of 48.2 ± 7.4 °C. The species of butterflies displayed differences in maximum critical temperature between the campo rupestre and forest islands that can be related to the two distinct habitats, but this did not correlate phylogenetically. Species from the forest islands were also divided into two groups, “resistant” and “non-resistant”, probably due to the heterogeneity of the habitat; the forest islands have a canopy, and in the understory, there are shaded and sunny areas. Species from forest islands, especially species that displayed lower thermal tolerance, may be more susceptible to global warming. View Full-Text
Keywords: CTmax; campo rupestre; forest islands; climate change; Espinhaço range; Brazil CTmax; campo rupestre; forest islands; climate change; Espinhaço range; Brazil
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Silva, V.D.; Beirão, M.V.; Cardoso, D.C. Thermal Tolerance of Fruit-Feeding Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) in Contrasting Mountaintop Environments. Insects 2020, 11, 278.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop