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Open AccessArticle

Induced Systemic Resistance by a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Impacts Development and Feeding Behavior of Aphids

1
Functional and Evolutionary Entomology, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liege, Passage des Déportés 2, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium
2
Microbial Processes and Interactions Research Unit, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liege, B-5030 Gembloux, Belgium
3
Laboratorio Interacciones Insecto-Planta, Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de Talca, 1141 Talca, Chile
4
Laboratorio de Ecología Vegetal, Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad de Talca, 1141 Talca, Chile
5
Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas Áridas (CEAZA), Universidad Católica del Norte, 1281 Coquimbo, Chile
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2020, 11(4), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11040234
Received: 23 March 2020 / Revised: 3 April 2020 / Accepted: 6 April 2020 / Published: 8 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biopesticide Development in Multitrophic Era)
The effects of microorganisms on plant-insect interactions have usually been underestimated. While plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are known to induce plant defenses, endosymbiotic bacteria hosted by herbivorous insects are often beneficial to the host. Here, we aimed to assess whether PGPR-induced defenses in broad bean plants impact the pea aphid, depending on its genotype and the presence of endosymbionts. We estimated aphid reproduction, quantified defense- and growth-related phytohormones by GC-MS, and measured different plant growth and physiology parameters, after PGPR treatment. In addition, we recorded the feeding behavior of aphids by electropenetrography. We found that the PGPR treatment of broad bean plants reduced the reproduction of one of the pea aphid clones. We highlighted a phenomenon of PGPR-induced plant defense priming, but no noticeable plant growth promotion. The main changes in aphid probing behavior were related to salivation events into phloem sieve elements. We suggest that the endosymbiont Hamiltonella defensa played a key role in plant-insect interactions, possibly helping aphids to counteract plant-induced resistance and allowing them to develop normally on PGPR-treated plants. Our results imply that plant- and aphid-associated microorganisms add greater complexity to the outcomes of aphid-plant interactions. View Full-Text
Keywords: Acyrthosiphon pisum; Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; electropenetrography; Hamiltonella defensa; interactions; plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR); Vicia faba Acyrthosiphon pisum; Bacillus amyloliquefaciens; electropenetrography; Hamiltonella defensa; interactions; plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR); Vicia faba
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Serteyn, L.; Quaghebeur, C.; Ongena, M.; Cabrera, N.; Barrera, A.; Molina-Montenegro, M.A.; Francis, F.; Ramírez, C.C. Induced Systemic Resistance by a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Impacts Development and Feeding Behavior of Aphids. Insects 2020, 11, 234.

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