Next Article in Journal
Dispersibility of the Pale Grass Blue Butterfly Zizeeria maha (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) Revealed by One-Individual Tracking in the Field: Quantitative Comparisons between Subspecies and between Sexes
Previous Article in Journal
The Roles of DNA Methyltransferases 1 (DNMT1) in Regulating Sexual Dimorphism in the Cotton Mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis
Open AccessArticle

First Comprehensive Study of a Giant among the Insects, Titanus giganteus: Basic Facts from Its Biochemistry, Physiology, and Anatomy

1
Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre, CAS, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
2
Faculty of Science, Branišovská 31, University of South Bohemia, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
3
Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Water, CENAKVA, University of South Bohemia, Institute of Aquaculture and Protection of Waters, Husova tř. 458/102, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2020, 11(2), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11020120
Received: 22 January 2020 / Revised: 30 January 2020 / Accepted: 6 February 2020 / Published: 12 February 2020
Titanus giganteus is one of the largest insects in the world, but unfortunately, there is a lack of basic information about its biology. Previous papers have mostly described Titanus morphology or taxonomy, but studies concerning its anatomy and physiology are largely absent. Thus, we employed microscopic, physiological, and analytical methods to partially fill this gap. Our study focused on a detailed analysis of the antennal sensilla, where coeloconic sensilla, grouped into irregularly oval fields, and sensilla trichoidea were found. Further, the inspection of the internal organs showed apparent degeneration of the gut and almost total absence of fat body. The gut was already empty; however, certain activity of digestive enzymes was recorded. The brain was relatively small, and the ventral nerve cord consisted of three ganglia in the thorax and four ganglia in the abdomen. Each testis was composed of approximately 30 testicular follicles filled with a clearly visible sperm. Chromatographic analysis of lipids in the flight muscles showed the prevalence of storage lipids that contained 13 fatty acids, and oleic acid represented 60% of them. Some of our findings indicate that adult Titanus rely on previously accumulated reserves rather than feeding from the time of eclosion. View Full-Text
Keywords: brain; Cerambycidae; chromatography; compound eye; digestive enzyme; electron microscopy; lipid metabolism; muscle; sensilla; testes brain; Cerambycidae; chromatography; compound eye; digestive enzyme; electron microscopy; lipid metabolism; muscle; sensilla; testes
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Dvořáček, J.; Sehadová, H.; Weyda, F.; Tomčala, A.; Hejníková, M.; Kodrík, D. First Comprehensive Study of a Giant among the Insects, Titanus giganteus: Basic Facts from Its Biochemistry, Physiology, and Anatomy. Insects 2020, 11, 120.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop