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Clinical Perspective and Translational Oncology of Liquid Biopsy

1
Department of Cellular Biology, Histology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Valladolid, Campus de Soria, 42003 Soria, Spain
2
Cancer Research Centre, University of Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca, Spain
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Institute of Biomedical Research of Salamanca, University Hospital of Salamanca (IBSAL), 3007 Salamanca, Spain
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Department of Anatomy and Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Valladolid, Campus of Soria, 42003 Soria, Spain
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Oncology Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diagnostics 2020, 10(7), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10070443
Received: 27 May 2020 / Revised: 23 June 2020 / Accepted: 29 June 2020 / Published: 30 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics)
The term liquid biopsy (LB) refers to the study of circulating tumor cells, circulating tumors nucleic acids free of cells or contained in exosomes, and information about platelets associated with tumors. LB can be performed in different biofluids and allows the limitations of tissue biopsy to be overcome offering possibilities of tumor identification reflecting in real time tumor heterogeneity. In addition, LB allows screening and early detection of cancer, real-time monitoring of therapy, stratification and therapeutic intervention, a therapeutic target and resistance mechanism, and a risk of metastatic relapse. Currently, LB has been shown to be effective for its application in different types of tumors including lung, colorectal, prostate, melanoma, breast and pancreatic cancer, by the determination and identification of biomarkers that with a high probability have the potential to change the way in which medical oncology could predict the course of the disease. These biomarkers make it possible to capture the heterogeneity of the cancer, monitor its clonal evolution, indicate new treatments or retreatments and evaluate the responses to different evolutionary and/or therapeutic pressures in the cancer disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: liquid biopsy; cancer detection; clinical practice; molecular profile; minimal residual disease; response monitoring; early detection; resistance mechanisms; translational oncology liquid biopsy; cancer detection; clinical practice; molecular profile; minimal residual disease; response monitoring; early detection; resistance mechanisms; translational oncology
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Fernández-Lázaro, D.; García Hernández, J.L.; Caballero García, A.; Caballero del Castillo, A.; Villaverde Hueso, M.; Cruz-Hernández, J.J. Clinical Perspective and Translational Oncology of Liquid Biopsy. Diagnostics 2020, 10, 443.

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