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Consequences and Resolution of Transcription–Replication Conflicts

Institute of Epigenetics and Stem Cells (IES), Helmholtz Zentrum München, 81377 Munich, Germany
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Academic Editor: Belén Gómez González
Life 2021, 11(7), 637; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070637
Received: 16 May 2021 / Revised: 28 June 2021 / Accepted: 28 June 2021 / Published: 30 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transcription-Associated Genetic Instability)
Transcription–replication conflicts occur when the two critical cellular machineries responsible for gene expression and genome duplication collide with each other on the same genomic location. Although both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have evolved multiple mechanisms to coordinate these processes on individual chromosomes, it is now clear that conflicts can arise due to aberrant transcription regulation and premature proliferation, leading to DNA replication stress and genomic instability. As both are considered hallmarks of aging and human diseases such as cancer, understanding the cellular consequences of conflicts is of paramount importance. In this article, we summarize our current knowledge on where and when collisions occur and how these encounters affect the genome and chromatin landscape of cells. Finally, we conclude with the different cellular pathways and multiple mechanisms that cells have put in place at conflict sites to ensure the resolution of conflicts and accurate genome duplication. View Full-Text
Keywords: transcription–replication conflicts; genomic instability; R-loops; torsional stress; common fragile sites; early replicating fragile sites; replication stress; chromatin; fork reversal; MIDAS; G-MiDS transcription–replication conflicts; genomic instability; R-loops; torsional stress; common fragile sites; early replicating fragile sites; replication stress; chromatin; fork reversal; MIDAS; G-MiDS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lalonde, M.; Trauner, M.; Werner, M.; Hamperl, S. Consequences and Resolution of Transcription–Replication Conflicts. Life 2021, 11, 637. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070637

AMA Style

Lalonde M, Trauner M, Werner M, Hamperl S. Consequences and Resolution of Transcription–Replication Conflicts. Life. 2021; 11(7):637. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070637

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lalonde, Maxime, Manuel Trauner, Marcel Werner, and Stephan Hamperl. 2021. "Consequences and Resolution of Transcription–Replication Conflicts" Life 11, no. 7: 637. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070637

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