Next Article in Journal
Mechanically Induced Cavitation in Biological Systems
Previous Article in Journal
Extensive Metabolite Profiling in the Unexploited Organs of Black Tiger for Their Potential Valorization in the Pharmaceutical Industry
Review

Salinity Stress in Potato: Understanding Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Responses

1
ICAR-Central Potato Research Institute, Shimla 171001, Himachal Pradesh, India
2
School of Agricultural Sciences, G D Goenka University, Gurugram 122103, Haryana, India
3
Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, MTTC&VTC, Central Agriculture University, Imphal 795004, Manipur, India
4
ICAR-Central Research Institute for Jute and Allied Fibres, Kolkata 700120, West Bengal, India
5
Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 FOUR Program), Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally as co-first authors to this work.
Academic Editors: Balazs Barna and Kousuke Hanada
Life 2021, 11(6), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11060545
Received: 30 April 2021 / Revised: 1 June 2021 / Accepted: 4 June 2021 / Published: 10 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Plant Science)
Among abiotic stresses, salinity is a major global threat to agriculture, causing severe damage to crop production and productivity. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is regarded as a future food crop by FAO to ensure food security, which is severely affected by salinity. The growth of the potato plant is inhibited under salt stress due to osmotic stress-induced ion toxicity. Salinity-mediated osmotic stress leads to physiological changes in the plant, including nutrient imbalance, impairment in detoxifying reactive oxygen species (ROS), membrane damage, and reduced photosynthetic activities. Several physiological and biochemical phenomena, such as the maintenance of plant water status, transpiration, respiration, water use efficiency, hormonal balance, leaf area, germination, and antioxidants production are adversely affected. The ROS under salinity stress leads to the increased plasma membrane permeability and extravasations of substances, which causes water imbalance and plasmolysis. However, potato plants cope with salinity mediated oxidative stress conditions by enhancing both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant activities. The osmoprotectants, such as proline, polyols (sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, lactitol, and maltitol), and quaternary ammonium compound (glycine betaine) are synthesized to overcome the adverse effect of salinity. The salinity response and tolerance include complex and multifaceted mechanisms that are controlled by multiple proteins and their interactions. This review aims to redraw the attention of researchers to explore the current physiological, biochemical and molecular responses and subsequently develop potential mitigation strategies against salt stress in potatoes. View Full-Text
Keywords: salt tolerance; salinity; potato; abiotic stress; osmotic; genetic engineering salt tolerance; salinity; potato; abiotic stress; osmotic; genetic engineering
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Chourasia, K.N.; Lal, M.K.; Tiwari, R.K.; Dev, D.; Kardile, H.B.; Patil, V.U.; Kumar, A.; Vanishree, G.; Kumar, D.; Bhardwaj, V.; Meena, J.K.; Mangal, V.; Shelake, R.M.; Kim, J.-Y.; Pramanik, D. Salinity Stress in Potato: Understanding Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Responses. Life 2021, 11, 545. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11060545

AMA Style

Chourasia KN, Lal MK, Tiwari RK, Dev D, Kardile HB, Patil VU, Kumar A, Vanishree G, Kumar D, Bhardwaj V, Meena JK, Mangal V, Shelake RM, Kim J-Y, Pramanik D. Salinity Stress in Potato: Understanding Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Responses. Life. 2021; 11(6):545. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11060545

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chourasia, Kumar N., Milan K. Lal, Rahul K. Tiwari, Devanshu Dev, Hemant B. Kardile, Virupaksh U. Patil, Amarjeet Kumar, Girimalla Vanishree, Dharmendra Kumar, Vinay Bhardwaj, Jitendra K. Meena, Vikas Mangal, Rahul M. Shelake, Jae-Yean Kim, and Dibyajyoti Pramanik. 2021. "Salinity Stress in Potato: Understanding Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Responses" Life 11, no. 6: 545. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11060545

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop