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Review

Evidence of the Cellular Senescence Stress Response in Mitotically Active Brain Cells—Implications for Cancer and Neurodegeneration

1
Section of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
2
Sticht Center for Healthy Aging and Alzheimer’s Prevention, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA
3
Bowman Gray Center for Medical Education, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27101, USA
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Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27109, USA
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Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Department of Pharmacological Sciences, Mount Sinai Center for Transformative Disease Modeling, Icahn Institute for Data Science and Genomic Technology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
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Salisbury VA Medical Center, Salisbury, NC 28144, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Markus Riessland
Life 2021, 11(2), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020153
Received: 19 January 2021 / Revised: 9 February 2021 / Accepted: 9 February 2021 / Published: 17 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellular Senescence in Health, Disease and Aging: Blessing or Curse?)
Cellular stress responses influence cell fate decisions. Apoptosis and proliferation represent opposing reactions to cellular stress or damage and may influence distinct health outcomes. Clinical and epidemiological studies consistently report inverse comorbidities between age-associated neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. This review discusses how one particular stress response, cellular senescence, may contribute to this inverse correlation. In mitotically competent cells, senescence is favorable over uncontrolled proliferation, i.e., cancer. However, senescent cells notoriously secrete deleterious molecules that drive disease, dysfunction and degeneration in surrounding tissue. In recent years, senescent cells have emerged as unexpected mediators of neurodegenerative diseases. The present review uses pre-defined criteria to evaluate evidence of cellular senescence in mitotically competent brain cells, highlights the discovery of novel molecular regulators and discusses how this single cell fate decision impacts cancer and degeneration in the brain. We also underscore methodological considerations required to appropriately evaluate the cellular senescence stress response in the brain. View Full-Text
Keywords: cellular senescence; Alzheimer’s disease; biology of aging; neurodegeneration; brain; geroscience; senolytics; tauopathy; cancer; stress response cellular senescence; Alzheimer’s disease; biology of aging; neurodegeneration; brain; geroscience; senolytics; tauopathy; cancer; stress response
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gillispie, G.J.; Sah, E.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Ahmidouch, M.Y.; Zhang, B.; Orr, M.E. Evidence of the Cellular Senescence Stress Response in Mitotically Active Brain Cells—Implications for Cancer and Neurodegeneration. Life 2021, 11, 153. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020153

AMA Style

Gillispie GJ, Sah E, Krishnamurthy S, Ahmidouch MY, Zhang B, Orr ME. Evidence of the Cellular Senescence Stress Response in Mitotically Active Brain Cells—Implications for Cancer and Neurodegeneration. Life. 2021; 11(2):153. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020153

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gillispie, Gregory J., Eric Sah, Sudarshan Krishnamurthy, Mohamed Y. Ahmidouch, Bin Zhang, and Miranda E. Orr. 2021. "Evidence of the Cellular Senescence Stress Response in Mitotically Active Brain Cells—Implications for Cancer and Neurodegeneration" Life 11, no. 2: 153. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020153

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