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Article

Gene Expression Profiles in Two Razor Clam Populations: Discerning Drivers of Population Status

1
Southwest Alaska Network, Inventory & Monitoring Program, National Park Service, Fairbanks, AK 99709, USA
2
Western Ecological Research Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Davis, CA 95616, USA
3
Alaska Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Anchorage, AK 99501, USA
4
Massachusetts Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Massachusetts, U.S. Geological Survey, Amherst, MA 01002, USA
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Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Homer, AK 99603, USA
6
Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK 99664, USA
7
Eastern Regional Research Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Wyndmoor, PA 19038, USA
8
College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Seward, AK 99664, USA
9
Kenai Fjords National Park, National Park Service, Seward, AK 99664, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Seth E Frietze, Michael Sheriff and Abbey Wilson
Life 2021, 11(12), 1288; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121288
Received: 2 September 2021 / Revised: 18 November 2021 / Accepted: 18 November 2021 / Published: 24 November 2021
With rapidly changing marine ecosystems, shifts in abundance and distribution are being documented for a variety of intertidal species. We examined two adjacent populations of Pacific razor clams (Siliqua patula) in lower Cook Inlet, Alaska. One population (east) supported a sport and personal use fishery, but this has been closed since 2015 due to declines in abundance, and the second population (west) continues to support commercial and sport fisheries. We used gene expression to investigate potential causes of the east side decline, comparing razor clam physiological responses between east and west Cook Inlet. The target gene profile used was developed for razor clam populations in Alaska based on physiological responses to environmental stressors. In this study, we identified no differences of gene expression between east and west populations, leading to two potential conclusions: (1) differences in factors capable of influencing physiology exist between the east and west and are sufficient to influence razor clam populations but are not detected by the genes in our panel, or (2) physiological processes do not account for the differences in abundance, and other factors such as predation or changes in habitat may be impacting the east Cook Inlet population. View Full-Text
Keywords: Pacific razor clam; Siliqua patula; gene expression; environmental drivers; clam population decline; predation Pacific razor clam; Siliqua patula; gene expression; environmental drivers; clam population decline; predation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Coletti, H.A.; Bowen, L.; Ballachey, B.E.; Wilson, T.L.; Waters, S.; Booz, M.; Counihan, K.L.; Hollmen, T.E.; Pister, B. Gene Expression Profiles in Two Razor Clam Populations: Discerning Drivers of Population Status. Life 2021, 11, 1288. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121288

AMA Style

Coletti HA, Bowen L, Ballachey BE, Wilson TL, Waters S, Booz M, Counihan KL, Hollmen TE, Pister B. Gene Expression Profiles in Two Razor Clam Populations: Discerning Drivers of Population Status. Life. 2021; 11(12):1288. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121288

Chicago/Turabian Style

Coletti, Heather A., Lizabeth Bowen, Brenda E. Ballachey, Tammy L. Wilson, Shannon Waters, Michael Booz, Katrina L. Counihan, Tuula E. Hollmen, and Benjamin Pister. 2021. "Gene Expression Profiles in Two Razor Clam Populations: Discerning Drivers of Population Status" Life 11, no. 12: 1288. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121288

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