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Article

Phase Relations in MAFSH System up to 21 GPa: Implications for Water Cycles in Martian Interior

by 1,* and 1,2,3
1
Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577, Japan
2
Department of Earth and Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan
3
Hiroshima Institute of Plate Convergence Region Research (HiPeR), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2019, 9(9), 559; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090559
Received: 3 August 2019 / Revised: 12 September 2019 / Accepted: 14 September 2019 / Published: 16 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Physics—In Memory of Orson Anderson)
To elucidate the water cycles in iron-rich Mars, we investigated the phase relation of a water-undersaturated (2 wt.%) analog of Martian mantle in simplified MgO-Al2O3-FeO-SiO2-H2O (MAFSH) system between 15 and 21 GPa at 900–1500 °C using a multi-anvil apparatus. Results showed that phase E coexisting with wadsleyite or ringwoodite was at least stable at 15–16.5 GPa and below 1050 °C. Phase D coexisted with ringwoodite at pressures higher than 16.5 GPa and temperatures below 1100 °C. The transition pressure of the loop at the wadsleyite-ringwoodite boundary shifted towards lower pressure in an iron-rich system compared with a hydrous pyrolite model of the Earth. Some evidence indicates that water once existed on the Martian surface on ancient Mars. The water present in the hydrous crust might have been brought into the deep interior by the convecting mantle. Therefore, water might have been transported to the deep Martian interior by hydrous minerals, such as phase E and phase D, in cold subduction plates. Moreover, it might have been stored in wadsleyite or ringwoodite after those hydrous materials decomposed when the plates equilibrated thermally with the surrounding Martian mantle. View Full-Text
Keywords: high pressure; high temperature; Martian interior; water storage; water transport high pressure; high temperature; Martian interior; water storage; water transport
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, C.; Inoue, T. Phase Relations in MAFSH System up to 21 GPa: Implications for Water Cycles in Martian Interior. Minerals 2019, 9, 559. https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090559

AMA Style

Xu C, Inoue T. Phase Relations in MAFSH System up to 21 GPa: Implications for Water Cycles in Martian Interior. Minerals. 2019; 9(9):559. https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090559

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Chaowen; Inoue, Toru. 2019. "Phase Relations in MAFSH System up to 21 GPa: Implications for Water Cycles in Martian Interior" Minerals 9, no. 9: 559. https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090559

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