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Open AccessArticle

Agroforestry Innovation through Planned Farmer Behavior: Trimming in Pine–Coffee Systems

1
Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Brawijaya, Malang 65145, Indonesia
2
UK Centre of Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster LA14AP, UK
3
World Agroforestry (ICRAF), Bogor 16155, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Land 2020, 9(10), 363; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100363
Received: 26 August 2020 / Revised: 22 September 2020 / Accepted: 22 September 2020 / Published: 30 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agroforestry-Based Ecosystem Services)
Knowledge transfer depends on the motivations of the target users. A case study of the intention of Indonesian coffee farmers to use a tree canopy trimming technique in pine–based agroforestry highlights path-dependency and complexity of social-ecological relationships. Farmers have contracts permitting coffee cultivation under pine trees owned by the state forestry company but have no right to fell trees. A multidisciplinary international team of scientists supported farmers at the University of Brawijaya Forest in East Java to trial canopy trimming to improve light for coffee production while maintaining tree density. Data were collected using surveys through interviews, case study analysis using in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and nonparticipant observations. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior, we found that though farmer attitudes toward trimming techniques were positive, several factors needed to be scrutinized: perceived limited socio-policy support and resources. While there is hope that canopy trimming can improve coffee production and local ecosystem services, a participatory and integrative extension and communication strategy will be needed. In the relationship between farmers as agents and forest authorities as principals, any agroforestry innovation needs to incorporate knowledge and concerns in the triangle of farmers, policymakers and empirical science. View Full-Text
Keywords: agroforestry; innovation transfer; trimming; intention; participatory and integrative research-extension; stakeholders agroforestry; innovation transfer; trimming; intention; participatory and integrative research-extension; stakeholders
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cahyono, E.D.; Fairuzzana, S.; Willianto, D.; Pradesti, E.; McNamara, N.P.; Rowe, R.L.; Noordwijk, M.v. Agroforestry Innovation through Planned Farmer Behavior: Trimming in Pine–Coffee Systems. Land 2020, 9, 363. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100363

AMA Style

Cahyono ED, Fairuzzana S, Willianto D, Pradesti E, McNamara NP, Rowe RL, Noordwijk Mv. Agroforestry Innovation through Planned Farmer Behavior: Trimming in Pine–Coffee Systems. Land. 2020; 9(10):363. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100363

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cahyono, Edi D.; Fairuzzana, Salsabila; Willianto, Deltanti; Pradesti, Eka; McNamara, Niall P.; Rowe, Rebecca L.; Noordwijk, Meine v.. 2020. "Agroforestry Innovation through Planned Farmer Behavior: Trimming in Pine–Coffee Systems" Land 9, no. 10: 363. https://doi.org/10.3390/land9100363

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