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Land 2018, 7(4), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/land7040161

Public Green Infrastructure Contributes to City Livability: A Systematic Quantitative Review

1
School of Design and Built Environment, Curtin University, Perth WA 6102, Australia
2
College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education—Environmental and Conservation Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth WA 6150, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 October 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 14 December 2018 / Published: 18 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Urbanism and Green Infrastructure)
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Abstract

Consistent with the Land Urbanism and Green Infrastructure theme of this special issue of Land, the primary goal of this review is to provide a plain language overview of recent literature that reports on the psychological, physiological, general well-being, and wider societal benefits that humans receive as a result of experiencing public green infrastructure (PGI) and nature in urbanized landscapes. This enhanced well-being and the wider societal benefits that accrue to urban dwellers as a result of interacting with quality PGI contributes to the concept known as city or urban livability. The quantitative analysis and theoretical synthesis reported in this review can inform decision makers, stakeholders, and other PGI and urban nature (UN) researchers of the benefits that urban populations receive from experiencing quality PGI spaces and UN and the contribution those spaces make to the livability of urban areas. With diminishing opportunities for the acquisition of new public open space to increase PGI and re-establish UN near urban centers, the efficient management and continuous improvement of existing PGI and UN is essential to promote and foster opportunities for human-to-nature contact and the known benefits therein derived. In addition to identifying an increased research interest and publication of articles that report on the contribution of PGI spaces to urban livability over the past decade, the review identifies and reports on the seven focus areas of PGI-livability research and the six attributes of PGI spaces that the current literatures report as contributing to the livability of urbanized landscapes. After providing a quantitative analysis for the reporting of those research areas and PGI attributes and summarizing key findings reported in the literature regarding the contribution that PGI spaces make to urban livability, this review also identifies knowledge gaps in the published literature and puts forward recommendations for further research in this rapidly expanding multidisciplinary field of research and policy development. View Full-Text
Keywords: biophilic design; public amenity; public green infrastructure (PGI); public open space; renaturing cities; sustainable development; livability; liveability; urban nature (UN); well-being biophilic design; public amenity; public green infrastructure (PGI); public open space; renaturing cities; sustainable development; livability; liveability; urban nature (UN); well-being
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Parker, J.; Simpson, G.D. Public Green Infrastructure Contributes to City Livability: A Systematic Quantitative Review. Land 2018, 7, 161.

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