Next Article in Journal
Characterizing the Spatial and Temporal Availability of Very High Resolution Satellite Imagery in Google Earth and Microsoft Bing Maps as a Source of Reference Data
Next Article in Special Issue
Understanding the Biodiversity Contributions of Small Protected Areas Presents Many Challenges
Previous Article in Journal
Combined Use of Optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar Data for REDD+ Applications in Malawi
Previous Article in Special Issue
Fairness and Transparency Are Required for the Inclusion of Privately Protected Areas in Publicly Accessible Conservation Databases
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Land 2018, 7(4), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/land7040117

Assessing Local Indigenous Knowledge and Information Sources on Biodiversity, Conservation and Protected Area Management at Khuvsgol Lake National Park, Mongolia

1
Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
2
Graduate School of Dairy Sciences, Rakuno Gakuen University, Hokkaido 069-0836, Japan
3
Graduate School of Global Studies, Doshisha University, Kyoto Prefecture 602-8580, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 September 2018 / Revised: 9 October 2018 / Accepted: 11 October 2018 / Published: 11 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity and Protected Areas)
Full-Text   |   PDF [10283 KB, uploaded 11 October 2018]   |  

Abstract

Indigenous knowledge about biodiversity and conservation is valuable and can be used to sustainably manage protected areas; however, indigenous communities continue to be marginalized due to the belief that their values and behaviors do not align with the overarching mission of conservation. This paper explores the extent of local knowledge and awareness of biodiversity, conservation and protected area management of indigenous communities at Khuvsgol Lake National Park, Mongolia. We investigate current levels of biodiversity awareness and explore perceptions toward conservation values and park management governance. Most respondents had a high awareness of existing biodiversity and held positive attitudes toward nature conservation and protected areas; however, insufficient knowledge of park rules and low levels of trust between local residents and park authorities may undermine conservation objectives in the long run. We identify an unequal share of economic benefits from tourism and preferential treatment toward elite business owners as a source of conflict. Limited information channels and poor communication between local residents and park authorities are also a source for low-level participation in conservation activities. Leveraging the increasing use of information communication technology, such as mobile phones, can serve as a new mechanism for improved information sharing and transparent reporting between local communities, conservationists and protected area authorities. View Full-Text
Keywords: protected areas; biodiversity; conservation; protected area management; information communication technology; Mongolia protected areas; biodiversity; conservation; protected area management; information communication technology; Mongolia
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

McCarthy, C.; Shinjo, H.; Hoshino, B.; Enkhjargal, E. Assessing Local Indigenous Knowledge and Information Sources on Biodiversity, Conservation and Protected Area Management at Khuvsgol Lake National Park, Mongolia. Land 2018, 7, 117.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Land EISSN 2073-445X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top