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Article

Stream Temperature and Environment Relationships in a Semiarid Riparian Corridor

1
Water Resources Graduate Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2
College of Agricultural Sciences, Ecohydrology Lab, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
3
Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Eva Papastergiadou
Land 2021, 10(5), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050519
Received: 6 April 2021 / Revised: 7 May 2021 / Accepted: 10 May 2021 / Published: 13 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land–Climate Interactions Section)
This study examined the relationship between stream temperature and environmental variables in a semiarid riparian corridor in northcentral Oregon, USA. The relationships between riparian vegetation cover, subsurface flow temperature, and stream temperature were characterized along an 800 m reach. Multiple stream temperature sensors were located along the reach, in open and closed canopy areas, with riparian vegetation cover ranging from 4% to 95%. A support vector regression (SVR) model was developed to assess the relationship between environmental characteristics and stream temperature at the larger valley scale. At the reach scale, results show that air temperature was highly correlated with stream temperature (Pearson’s r = 0.97), and no significant (p < 0.05) differences in stream temperature levels were found among sensor locations, irrespective of percent vegetation cover. Channel subsurface temperature levels from an intermittent flow tributary were generally cooler than those in the perennial stream in the summer and warmer during winter months, indicating that the tributary may have a localized moderating effect on stream temperature. At the valley scale, results from the SVR model showed that air temperature, followed by streamflow, was the strongest variable influencing stream temperature. Also, riparian area land cover showed little effect on stream temperature along the entire riparian corridor. This research indicates that air temperature, subsurface flow, and streamflow are important variables affecting the stream temperature variability observed in the study area. View Full-Text
Keywords: stream temperature; air temperature; riparian; climate change; land use; semiarid stream temperature; air temperature; riparian; climate change; land use; semiarid
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MDPI and ACS Style

Durfee, N.; Ochoa, C.G.; Jones, G. Stream Temperature and Environment Relationships in a Semiarid Riparian Corridor. Land 2021, 10, 519. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050519

AMA Style

Durfee N, Ochoa CG, Jones G. Stream Temperature and Environment Relationships in a Semiarid Riparian Corridor. Land. 2021; 10(5):519. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050519

Chicago/Turabian Style

Durfee, Nicole, Carlos G. Ochoa, and Gerrad Jones. 2021. "Stream Temperature and Environment Relationships in a Semiarid Riparian Corridor" Land 10, no. 5: 519. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050519

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