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Article

Low-Impact Development (LID) in Coastal Watersheds: Infiltration Swale Pollutant Transfer in Transitional Tropical/Subtropical Climates

1
Environmental Engineering Department, University of West Santa Catarina, Xaxim 89825-000, SC, Brazil
2
Urban Stormwater and Compensatory Technique Laboratory, Sanitary Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-970, SC, Brazil
3
Civil Engineering Department, Contestado University, Concórdia 89711-330, SC, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Francesco De Paola
Water 2022, 14(2), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020238
Received: 30 November 2021 / Revised: 7 January 2022 / Accepted: 11 January 2022 / Published: 14 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Urban Runoff Pollution)
The control of runoff pollution is one of the advantages of low-impact development (LID) or sustainable drainage systems (SUDs), such as infiltration swales. Coastal areas may have characteristics that make the implementation of drainage systems difficult, such as sandy soils, shallow aquifers and flat terrains. The presence of contaminants was investigated through sampling and analysis of runoff, soil, and groundwater from a coastal region served by an infiltration swale located in southern Brazil. The swale proved to be very efficient in controlling the site’s urban drainage volumes even under intense tropical rainfall. Contaminants of Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni were identified at concentrations above the Brazilian regulatory limit (BRL) in both runoff and groundwater. Soil concentrations were low and within the regulatory limits, except for Cd. The soil was predominantly sandy, with neutral pH and low ionic exchange capacity, characteristic of coastal regions and not very suitable for contaminant retention. Thus, this kind of structure requires improvements for its use in similar environments, such as the use of adsorbents in soil swale to increase its retention capacity. View Full-Text
Keywords: LID; swale; runoff; water quality; groundwater; soil; coastal area LID; swale; runoff; water quality; groundwater; soil; coastal area
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rech, A.; Pacheco, E.; Caprario, J.; Rech, J.C.; Finotti, A.R. Low-Impact Development (LID) in Coastal Watersheds: Infiltration Swale Pollutant Transfer in Transitional Tropical/Subtropical Climates. Water 2022, 14, 238. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020238

AMA Style

Rech A, Pacheco E, Caprario J, Rech JC, Finotti AR. Low-Impact Development (LID) in Coastal Watersheds: Infiltration Swale Pollutant Transfer in Transitional Tropical/Subtropical Climates. Water. 2022; 14(2):238. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020238

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rech, Aline, Elisa Pacheco, Jakcemara Caprario, Julio C. Rech, and Alexandra R. Finotti. 2022. "Low-Impact Development (LID) in Coastal Watersheds: Infiltration Swale Pollutant Transfer in Transitional Tropical/Subtropical Climates" Water 14, no. 2: 238. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020238

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