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Open AccessArticle

Building the Treaty #3 Nibi Declaration Using an Anishinaabe Methodology of Ceremony, Language and Engagement

by 1,* and 2,*
1
Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6L5, Canada
2
Territorial Planning Unit, Grand Council Treaty #3, Kenora, ON P9N 3X7, Canada
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Athanasios Loukas
Water 2021, 13(4), 532; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040532
Received: 17 December 2020 / Revised: 8 February 2021 / Accepted: 8 February 2021 / Published: 18 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Water Governance through Indigenous Research Approaches)
Ratified in 2019, the Nibi Declaration of Treaty #3 voices the relationship with water (Nibi) and jurisdictional responsibility that all Anishinaabe citizens have within the Treaty #3 territory. It affirms the responsibilities and relationships that others living within the territory should have with the water and ensures that the spirit of Nibi is central to decision-making and water governance. This article details the process of developing The Declaration, in accordance with the Treaty #3 lawmaking process and, which was driven by women, in ceremony, with the help of Gitiizii m-inaanik, and with the input of The Nation as a whole. This process embodies nationhood, sovereignty, and Anishinaabe jurisdiction as it relates to the environment and water, in accordance with the Manito Aki Inakonigaawin (Mother Earth law). Every person has a relationship with water. The process of nurturing that relationship through the teachings exemplified in the implementation of The Declaration will provide clarity on the responsibilities and partnerships that must be developed to protect the water for future generations. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous water governance; indigenous laws; indigenous governance; indigenous methodology; Anishinaabe; Nibi indigenous water governance; indigenous laws; indigenous governance; indigenous methodology; Anishinaabe; Nibi
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MDPI and ACS Style

Craft, A.; King, L. Building the Treaty #3 Nibi Declaration Using an Anishinaabe Methodology of Ceremony, Language and Engagement. Water 2021, 13, 532. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040532

AMA Style

Craft A, King L. Building the Treaty #3 Nibi Declaration Using an Anishinaabe Methodology of Ceremony, Language and Engagement. Water. 2021; 13(4):532. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040532

Chicago/Turabian Style

Craft, Aimée; King, Lucas. 2021. "Building the Treaty #3 Nibi Declaration Using an Anishinaabe Methodology of Ceremony, Language and Engagement" Water 13, no. 4: 532. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040532

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