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Article

Beyond Institutional Ethics: Anishinaabe Worldviews and the Development of a Culturally Sensitive Field Protocol for Aquatic Plant Research

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College of Arts, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
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School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
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College of Social and Applied Human Sciences Alum, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
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School of Environmental Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dalles Rd, Kenora, ON P9N 0J2, Canada.
Academic Editors: Deborah McGregor and Aimee Craft
Water 2021, 13(5), 709; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13050709
Received: 9 December 2020 / Revised: 1 March 2021 / Accepted: 2 March 2021 / Published: 5 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Water Governance through Indigenous Research Approaches)
Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS2) guides knowledge production and dissemination in Canada. While it is intended to protect vulnerable populations from harm, it fails to consider Anishinaabe worldviews and, by extension, to effectively direct ethical water research with aquatic plant life. Using Anishinaabe oral testimony and oral stories, Niisaachewan Anishinaabe Nation (NAN) and the University of Guelph (UofG) co-developed a culturally sensitive field protocol to respect Manomin (Wild Rice) as an other-than-human being and guide research into Manomin restoration. By illuminating key directives from NAN, this article showcases the limitations of institutional ethics in Canada. It concludes with recommendations to broaden TCPS2 to better address Anishinaabe teachings about plant and animal relations, but ultimately challenges institutional Research Ethics Boards (REBs) to relinquish control and respect Indigenous Nations’ right to govern research within their territories. View Full-Text
Keywords: Anishinaabe worldviews; research ethics; aquatic plant life; field protocol; decolonizing methodology; First Nations Anishinaabe worldviews; research ethics; aquatic plant life; field protocol; decolonizing methodology; First Nations
MDPI and ACS Style

Luby, B.; Mehltretter, S.; Flewelling, R.; Lehman, M.; Goldhar, G.; Pattrick, E.; Mariotti, J.; Bradford, A.; Niisaachewan Anishinaabe Nation. Beyond Institutional Ethics: Anishinaabe Worldviews and the Development of a Culturally Sensitive Field Protocol for Aquatic Plant Research. Water 2021, 13, 709. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13050709

AMA Style

Luby B, Mehltretter S, Flewelling R, Lehman M, Goldhar G, Pattrick E, Mariotti J, Bradford A, Niisaachewan Anishinaabe Nation. Beyond Institutional Ethics: Anishinaabe Worldviews and the Development of a Culturally Sensitive Field Protocol for Aquatic Plant Research. Water. 2021; 13(5):709. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13050709

Chicago/Turabian Style

Luby, Brittany, Samantha Mehltretter, Robert Flewelling, Margaret Lehman, Gabrielle Goldhar, Elli Pattrick, Jane Mariotti, Andrea Bradford, and Niisaachewan Anishinaabe Nation. 2021. "Beyond Institutional Ethics: Anishinaabe Worldviews and the Development of a Culturally Sensitive Field Protocol for Aquatic Plant Research" Water 13, no. 5: 709. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13050709

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