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Article

Physicochemical Interactions in Systems C.I. Direct Yellow 50—Weakly Basic Resins: Kinetic, Equilibrium, and Auxiliaries Addition Aspects

Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Sciences, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, M. Curie-Sklodowska Sq. 2, 20-031 Lublin, Poland
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Academic Editor: Joanna Karpińska
Water 2021, 13(3), 385; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030385
Received: 1 January 2021 / Revised: 26 January 2021 / Accepted: 28 January 2021 / Published: 2 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Aspects of Occurrence and Removal of Emerging Pollutants)
Intensive development of many industries, including textile, paper or plastic, which consume large amounts of water and generate huge amounts of wastewater-containing toxic dyes, contribute to pollution of the aquatic environment. Among many known methods of wastewater treatment, adsorption techniques are considered the most effective. In the present study, the weakly basic anion exchangers such as Amberlyst A21, Amberlyst A23 and Amberlyst A24 of the polystyrene, phenol-formaldehyde and polyacrylic matrices were used for C.I. Direct Yellow 50 removal from aqueous solutions. The equilibrium adsorption data were well fitted to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Kinetic studies were described by the pseudo-second order model. The pseudo-second order rate constants were in the range of 0.0609–0.0128 g/mg·min for Amberlyst A24, 0.0038–0.0015 g/mg·min for Amberlyst A21 and 1.1945–0.0032 g/mg·min for Amberlyst A23, and decreased with the increasing initial concentration of dye from 100–500 mg/L, respectively. There were observed auxiliaries (Na2CO3, Na2SO4, anionic and non-ionic surfactants) impact on the dye uptake. The polyacrylic resin Amberlyst A24 can be promising sorbent for C.I. Direct Yellow 50 removal as it is able to uptake 666.5 mg/g of the dye compared to the phenol-formaldehyde Amberlyst A23 which has a 284.3 mg/g capacity. View Full-Text
Keywords: Amberlyst; anion exchanger; direct dye; removal; resins; sorption; wastewaters Amberlyst; anion exchanger; direct dye; removal; resins; sorption; wastewaters
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wawrzkiewicz, M.; Polska-Adach, E. Physicochemical Interactions in Systems C.I. Direct Yellow 50—Weakly Basic Resins: Kinetic, Equilibrium, and Auxiliaries Addition Aspects. Water 2021, 13, 385. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030385

AMA Style

Wawrzkiewicz M, Polska-Adach E. Physicochemical Interactions in Systems C.I. Direct Yellow 50—Weakly Basic Resins: Kinetic, Equilibrium, and Auxiliaries Addition Aspects. Water. 2021; 13(3):385. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030385

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wawrzkiewicz, Monika, and Ewelina Polska-Adach. 2021. "Physicochemical Interactions in Systems C.I. Direct Yellow 50—Weakly Basic Resins: Kinetic, Equilibrium, and Auxiliaries Addition Aspects" Water 13, no. 3: 385. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030385

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