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Article

Effect of Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Soil Detachment Capacities of Three Loamy Soils on the Loess Plateau of China

by 1, 2,3,*, 2,3, 2,3 and 1,*
1
College of Agricultural Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China
2
Changjiang River Scientific Research Institute, Changjiang Water Resources Commission, Wuhan 430010, China
3
Engineering Technology Research Center of Mountain Flood Geological Disaster Prevention and Control, Ministry of Water Resources, Wuhan 430010, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Csaba Centeri
Water 2021, 13(3), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030342
Received: 11 January 2021 / Revised: 25 January 2021 / Accepted: 26 January 2021 / Published: 29 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Water Erosion)
Soil detachment is the initial phase of soil erosion and is of great significance to study in seasonal freeze-thaw regions. In order to elucidate the effects mechanism of freeze-thaw cycles on soil detachment capacity of different soils, a sandy loam, a silt loam, and a clay loam were subjected to 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 freeze-thaw cycles before they were scoured. The results revealed that with increased freeze-thaw cycles, soil bulk density and water-stable aggregates content decreased after the first few times and then kept nearly stable after about 10 cycles, especially for sandy loam. The shear strength of all soils gradually decreased as freeze-thaw cycles increased, except the values of clay loam increased subsequent to the 5th and 15th cycles. After the 20th cycle, the degree of decline of silt loam was the greatest (77.72%), followed by sandy loam (63.18%) and clay loam (39.77%). The soil organic matter of clay loam was much greater than silt loam and sandy loam and all significantly increased after freeze-thaw. Soil detachment capacity of silt loam and sandy loam was positively correlated with freeze-thaw cycle, which was contrary to findings for clay loam. The values of clay loam increased at first and then decreased during the cycles, reaching minimum values at about the 15–20th cycle. After the 20th cycle, the values of sandy loam and silt loam significantly increased 1.62 and 4.74 times over unfrozen, respectively, which was greater than clay loam (0.53 times). A nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the soil detachment capacity of silt loam could be estimated well by soil properties (R2 = 0.87, p < 0.05). This study can provide references for the study of the soil erosion mechanism in seasonal freeze-thaw regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: freeze-thaw cycles; loamy soil; soil property; soil detachment capacity; Loess Plateau freeze-thaw cycles; loamy soil; soil property; soil detachment capacity; Loess Plateau
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lu, J.; Sun, B.; Ren, F.; Li, H.; Jiao, X. Effect of Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Soil Detachment Capacities of Three Loamy Soils on the Loess Plateau of China. Water 2021, 13, 342. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030342

AMA Style

Lu J, Sun B, Ren F, Li H, Jiao X. Effect of Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Soil Detachment Capacities of Three Loamy Soils on the Loess Plateau of China. Water. 2021; 13(3):342. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030342

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lu, Jian, Baoyang Sun, Feipeng Ren, Hao Li, and Xiyun Jiao. 2021. "Effect of Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Soil Detachment Capacities of Three Loamy Soils on the Loess Plateau of China" Water 13, no. 3: 342. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13030342

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