Next Article in Journal
Applicability of Difference in Oxygen-18 and Deuterium of Water Sources and Isotopic Hydrograph Separation in a Bamboo Catchment during Different Rainfall Types
Previous Article in Journal
Mechanism of Tsunami-Induced Erosion of Bridge-Abutment Backfill and Its Countermeasures
Previous Article in Special Issue
Best Practices for Monitoring and Assessing the Ecological Response to River Restoration
Article

Putting the “Beaver” Back in Beverley Brook: Rapid Shifts in Community Composition following the Restoration of a Degraded Urban River

1
Integrated Research in Life and Health Sciences, Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London SW15 4JD, UK
2
South East Rivers Trust, Carshalton SM5 2JG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Arantza Iriarte
Water 2021, 13(24), 3530; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243530
Received: 28 October 2021 / Revised: 2 December 2021 / Accepted: 5 December 2021 / Published: 9 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue River Restoration: Monitoring, Appraisal and Management)
Widespread habitat degradation has caused dramatic declines in aquatic biodiversity. Reconfiguring channels and adding physical structures to rivers has become common practice in order to reinstate natural processes and restore biodiversity. However, the effectiveness of such measures is often questioned, especially in urban settings where overriding factors (e.g., water quality) might constrain biotic responses to increased habitat heterogeneity. We monitored invertebrate and fish communities before and up to five years after extensive restoration of Beverley Brook, a small, urban river flowing through a Royal Park in London, UK. Total invertebrate density was 5–148% higher with restoration across the monitoring period, and there was an increase in evenness but not invertebrate richness. Riverflies (Ephmemeroptera and Trichoptera) and crustaceans (Amphipoda, Asellidae) showed marked increases in density with restoration, suggesting improved flow, enhanced water quality, and greater quantity of basal resources. Fish biomass increased by 282% with restoration as did fish richness and the average body mass of three common fish species. Our results provide evidence for the effectiveness of common restoration methods in increasing standing stocks across trophic levels, from basal resources to apex predators. However, we primarily observed changes in the density of existing taxa rather than the development of novel assemblages, suggesting that large-scale factors, such as water quality and the lack of adequate source populations, might be important for understanding changes in biodiversity following river restoration. View Full-Text
Keywords: BACI; biodiversity; biomonitoring; field experiment; food webs; restoration BACI; biodiversity; biomonitoring; field experiment; food webs; restoration
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Perkins, D.M.; Hull, T.; Bubb, N.; Cunningham, A.; Glackin, R.; Glen, T.; Smith, S.; Davies, B. Putting the “Beaver” Back in Beverley Brook: Rapid Shifts in Community Composition following the Restoration of a Degraded Urban River. Water 2021, 13, 3530. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243530

AMA Style

Perkins DM, Hull T, Bubb N, Cunningham A, Glackin R, Glen T, Smith S, Davies B. Putting the “Beaver” Back in Beverley Brook: Rapid Shifts in Community Composition following the Restoration of a Degraded Urban River. Water. 2021; 13(24):3530. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243530

Chicago/Turabian Style

Perkins, Daniel M., Toby Hull, Niamh Bubb, Alex Cunningham, Rory Glackin, Thomas Glen, Stacey Smith, and Bella Davies. 2021. "Putting the “Beaver” Back in Beverley Brook: Rapid Shifts in Community Composition following the Restoration of a Degraded Urban River" Water 13, no. 24: 3530. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243530

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop