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Article

The Origin of Quartz Cement in the Upper Triassic Second Member of the Xujiahe Formation Sandstones, Western Sichuan Basin, China

1
College of Energy Resources, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059, China
2
Sinopec Matrix Xinan MWD/LWD & Logging Corporation, Chengdu 610100, China
3
Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong 643000, China
4
Exploration and Development Research Institute, Sinopec Southwest Company, Chengdu 610041, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Howri Mansurbeg
Water 2021, 13(14), 1890; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141890
Received: 14 May 2021 / Revised: 28 June 2021 / Accepted: 3 July 2021 / Published: 8 July 2021
High-precision in situ δ18O values obtained using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for μm-size quartz cement are applied to constrain the origin of the silica in the deep-buried Upper Triassic second member of Xujiahe Formation tight sandstones, western Sichuan Basin, China. Petrographic, cathodoluminescence (CL), and fluid inclusion data from the quartz cements in the Xu2 sandstones indicate three distinct, separate quartz precipitation phases (referred to as Q1, Q2, and Q3). The Q1 quartz cement was formed at temperatures of approximately 56–85 °C and attained the highest δ18O values (ranging from 18.3 to 19.05‰ Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW)). The Q2 quartz cement was generated at temperatures of approximately 90–125 °C, accompanying the main phase of hydrocarbon fluid inclusions, with the highest Al2O3 content and high δ18O values (ranging from 15 to 17.99‰ VSMOW). The Q3 quartz cement was formed at temperatures of approximately 130–175 °C, with the lowest δ18O values (ranging from 12.79 to 15.47‰ VSMOW). A portion of the Q2 and Q3 quartz cement has a relatively high K2O content. The dissolution of feldspar and volcanic rock fragments was likely the most important source of silica for the Q1 quartz cement. The variations in δ18O(water) and trace element composition from the Q2 quartz cement to the Q3 quartz cement suggest that hydrocarbon emplacement and water-rock interactions greatly altered the chemistry of the pore fluid. Feldspar dissolution by organic acids, clay mineral reactions (illitization and chloritization of smectite), and pressure dissolution were the main sources of silica for the Q2 and Q3 quartz cements, while transformation of the clay minerals in the external shale unit was a limited silica source. View Full-Text
Keywords: quartz cement; oxygen isotopes; silica sources; tight sandstones; Sichuan Basin quartz cement; oxygen isotopes; silica sources; tight sandstones; Sichuan Basin
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ren, J.; Lv, Z.; Wang, H.; Wu, J.; Zhang, S. The Origin of Quartz Cement in the Upper Triassic Second Member of the Xujiahe Formation Sandstones, Western Sichuan Basin, China. Water 2021, 13, 1890. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141890

AMA Style

Ren J, Lv Z, Wang H, Wu J, Zhang S. The Origin of Quartz Cement in the Upper Triassic Second Member of the Xujiahe Formation Sandstones, Western Sichuan Basin, China. Water. 2021; 13(14):1890. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141890

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ren, Jie, Zhengxiang Lv, Honghui Wang, Jianmeng Wu, and Shunli Zhang. 2021. "The Origin of Quartz Cement in the Upper Triassic Second Member of the Xujiahe Formation Sandstones, Western Sichuan Basin, China" Water 13, no. 14: 1890. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141890

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