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Article

Pilot and Field Studies of Modular Bioretention Tree System with Talipariti tiliaceum and Engineered Soil Filter Media in the Tropics

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, Block E1A, #07-03, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576, Singapore
2
School of Life Sciences & Chemical Technology, Ngee Ann Polytechnic, 535 Clementi Road, Blk 83, Singapore 599489, Singapore
3
PUB, Singapore’s National Water Agency, 40 Scotts Road, #09-01 Environment Building, Singapore 228231, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jose G. Vasconcelos
Water 2021, 13(13), 1817; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131817
Received: 10 May 2021 / Revised: 28 June 2021 / Accepted: 28 June 2021 / Published: 30 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Runoff Control and Sponge City Construction)
Stormwater runoff management is challenging in a highly urbanised tropical environment due to the unique space constraints and tropical climate conditions. A modular bioretention tree (MBT) with a small footprint and a reduced on-site installation time was explored for application in a tropical environment. Tree species used in the pilot studies were Talipariti tiliaceum (TT1) and Sterculia macrophylla (TT2). Both of the MBTs could effectively remove total suspended solids (TSS), total phosphorus (TP), zinc, copper, cadmium, and lead with removal efficiencies of greater than 90%. Total nitrogen (TN) removal was noted to be significantly higher in the wet period compared to the dry period (p < 0.05). Variation in TN removal between TT1 and TT2 were attributed to the nitrogen uptake and the root formation of the trees species. A field study MBT using Talipariti tiliaceum had a very clean effluent quality, with average TSS, TP, and TN effluent EMC of 4.8 mg/L, 0.04 mg/L, and 0.27 mg/L, respectively. Key environmental factors were also investigated to study their impact on the performance of BMT. It was found that the initial pollutant concentration, the dissolved fraction of influent pollutants, and soil moisture affect the performance of the MBT. Based on the results from this study, the MBT demonstrates good capability in the improvement of stormwater runoff quality. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban runoff remediation; Talipariti tiliaceum; modular bioretention tree; field study; tree-pit urban runoff remediation; Talipariti tiliaceum; modular bioretention tree; field study; tree-pit
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lim, F.Y.; Neo, T.H.; Guo, H.; Goh, S.Z.; Ong, S.L.; Hu, J.; Lee, B.C.Y.; Ong, G.S.; Liou, C.X. Pilot and Field Studies of Modular Bioretention Tree System with Talipariti tiliaceum and Engineered Soil Filter Media in the Tropics. Water 2021, 13, 1817. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131817

AMA Style

Lim FY, Neo TH, Guo H, Goh SZ, Ong SL, Hu J, Lee BCY, Ong GS, Liou CX. Pilot and Field Studies of Modular Bioretention Tree System with Talipariti tiliaceum and Engineered Soil Filter Media in the Tropics. Water. 2021; 13(13):1817. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131817

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lim, Fang Y., Teck H. Neo, Huiling Guo, Sin Z. Goh, Say L. Ong, Jiangyong Hu, Brandon C.Y. Lee, Geok S. Ong, and Cui X. Liou 2021. "Pilot and Field Studies of Modular Bioretention Tree System with Talipariti tiliaceum and Engineered Soil Filter Media in the Tropics" Water 13, no. 13: 1817. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131817

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