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Open AccessArticle

2019–2020 Australia Fire and Its Relationship to Hydroclimatological and Vegetation Variabilities

1
Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
2
Departamento de Meteorología, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 644, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso 2360173, Chile
3
School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
4
Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(11), 3067; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113067
Received: 27 August 2020 / Revised: 27 October 2020 / Accepted: 27 October 2020 / Published: 2 November 2020
Wildfire is a major concern worldwide and particularly in Australia. The 2019–2020 wildfires in Australia became historically significant as they were widespread and extremely severe. Linking climate and vegetation settings to wildfires can provide insightful information for wildfire prediction, and help better understand wildfires behavior in the future. The goal of this research was to examine the relationship between the recent wildfires, various hydroclimatological variables, and satellite-retrieved vegetation indices. The analyses performed here show the uniqueness of the 2019–2020 wildfires. The near-surface air temperature from December 2019 to February 2020 was about 1 °C higher than the 20-year mean, which increased the evaporative demand. The lack of precipitation before the wildfires, due to an enhanced high-pressure system over southeast Australia, prevented the soil from having enough moisture to supply the demand, and set the stage for a large amount of dry fuel that highly favored the spread of the fires. View Full-Text
Keywords: Australia wildfires; extreme events; hydroclimatology; ecology; remote sensing; climate change; drought Australia wildfires; extreme events; hydroclimatology; ecology; remote sensing; climate change; drought
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ehsani, M.R.; Arevalo, J.; Risanto, C.B.; Javadian, M.; Devine, C.J.; Arabzadeh, A.; Venegas-Quiñones, H.L.; Dell’Oro, A.P.; Behrangi, A. 2019–2020 Australia Fire and Its Relationship to Hydroclimatological and Vegetation Variabilities. Water 2020, 12, 3067. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113067

AMA Style

Ehsani MR, Arevalo J, Risanto CB, Javadian M, Devine CJ, Arabzadeh A, Venegas-Quiñones HL, Dell’Oro AP, Behrangi A. 2019–2020 Australia Fire and Its Relationship to Hydroclimatological and Vegetation Variabilities. Water. 2020; 12(11):3067. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113067

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ehsani, Mohammad R.; Arevalo, Jorge; Risanto, Christoforus B.; Javadian, Mostafa; Devine, Charles J.; Arabzadeh, Alireza; Venegas-Quiñones, Hector L.; Dell’Oro, Ambria P.; Behrangi, Ali. 2020. "2019–2020 Australia Fire and Its Relationship to Hydroclimatological and Vegetation Variabilities" Water 12, no. 11: 3067. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113067

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