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Open AccessArticle

Maize Yield and Irrigation Applied in Conservation and Conventional Tillage at Various Plant Densities

Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
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Water 2019, 11(8), 1726; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081726
Received: 12 July 2019 / Revised: 7 August 2019 / Accepted: 14 August 2019 / Published: 19 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Precision Agriculture and Irrigation)
Maize is one of the most highly produced crops around the world. Factors such as population density, solar radiation, temperature, availability of nutrients and water, and proper tillage method can have favorable results in increasing yield. This project began in 2015, at two different locations in Georgia (Tifton and Camilla), GA, USA, and has been evaluated for three consecutive maize growing seasons. In each location, a different irrigation method was applied; the University of Georgia (UGA) maize checkbook method was utilized in Tifton and a soil moisture sensor-based method was utilized in Camilla. The different treatments consisted of two tillage methods, conservation and conventional, and four plant densities (69K, 88K, 99K, and 133K plants/ha). The purpose of the project was the evaluation of water requirements by population and tillage method for achieving high maize yields. Soil moisture information was collected hourly in both fields. The results showed that higher plant densities do not necessarily require higher irrigation amounts and do not always have the best results in terms of yield. Conventional tillage had slightly better yield results but not statistically different from conservation tilled plots. Additionally, the results showed that applied irrigation can help in higher maize production. However, increasing the amount of water does not directly equate to higher yield results. View Full-Text
Keywords: irrigation scheduling; soil moisture sensors; checkbook method; conservation tillage; conventional tillage; maize plant densities; maize yield irrigation scheduling; soil moisture sensors; checkbook method; conservation tillage; conventional tillage; maize plant densities; maize yield
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Orfanou, A.; Pavlou, D.; Porter, W.M. Maize Yield and Irrigation Applied in Conservation and Conventional Tillage at Various Plant Densities. Water 2019, 11, 1726.

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