Next Article in Journal
Assessment of the Impact of Forestry and Settlement-Forest Use of the Catchments on the Parameters of Surface Water Quality: Case Studies for Chechło Reservoir Catchment, Southern Poland
Previous Article in Journal
Long-Term Changes in the Zooplankton Community of Lake Maggiore in Response to Multiple Stressors: A Functional Principal Components Analysis
Article Menu
Issue 5 (May) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Application of Backpack-Mounted Mobile Mapping System and Rainfall–Runoff–Inundation Model for Flash Flood Analysis

1
Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji 611-0011, Japan
2
Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8540, Japan
3
Leica Geosystems K. K., 1-4-28, Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073, Japan
4
Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Nakaadachi 1, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8306, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(5), 963; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11050963
Received: 5 April 2019 / Revised: 28 April 2019 / Accepted: 4 May 2019 / Published: 8 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Improving Flood Detection and Monitoring through Remote Sensing)
  |  
PDF [15196 KB, uploaded 8 May 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Satellite remote sensing has been used effectively to estimate flood inundation extents in large river basins. In the case of flash floods in mountainous catchments, however, it is difficult to use remote sensing information. To compensate for this situation, detailed rainfall–runoff and flood inundation models have been utilized. Regardless of the recent technological advances in simulations, there has been a significant lack of data for validating such models, particularly with respect to local flood inundation depths. To estimate flood inundation depths, this study proposes using a backpack-mounted mobile mapping system (MMS) for post-flood surveys. Our case study in Northern Kyushu Island, which was affected by devastating flash floods in July 2017, suggests that the MMS can be used to estimate the inundation depth with an accuracy of 0.14 m. Furthermore, the landform change due to deposition of sediments could be estimated by the MMS survey. By taking into consideration the change of topography, the rainfall–runoff–inundation (RRI) model could reasonably reproduce the flood inundation compared with the MMS measurements. Overall, this study demonstrates the effective application of the MMS and RRI model for flash flood analysis in mountainous river catchments. View Full-Text
Keywords: mobile mapping system; RRI model; high-water marks; inundation; Northern Kyushu floods; point clouds mobile mapping system; RRI model; high-water marks; inundation; Northern Kyushu floods; point clouds
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sayama, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Kuwano, Y.; Takara, K. Application of Backpack-Mounted Mobile Mapping System and Rainfall–Runoff–Inundation Model for Flash Flood Analysis. Water 2019, 11, 963.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Water EISSN 2073-4441 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top