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Open AccessArticle

Degradation of Micropollutants by UV–Chlorine Treatment in Reclaimed Water: pH Effects, Formation of Disinfectant Byproducts, and Toxicity Assay

by Chi Wang 1, Zhian Ying 1, Ming Ma 1, Mingxin Huo 1,2,3,* and Wu Yang 1,2,3,*
1
School of Environment, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130117, China
2
Science and Technology Innovation Center for Municipal Wastewater Treatment and Water Quality Protection, Jilin Province, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130117, China
3
Engineering Lab for Water Pollution Control and Resources Recovery, Jilin Province, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130117, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(12), 2639; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11122639
Received: 7 November 2019 / Revised: 8 December 2019 / Accepted: 12 December 2019 / Published: 13 December 2019
The utilization of reclaimed water is a reliable and sustainable approach to enhance water supply in water-deficient cities. However, the presence of micro-organic pollutants (MPs) in reclaimed water has potential adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems and human health. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of 12 target MPs in the influent and reclaimed water collected from a local wastewater treatment plant, and the ultraviolet (UV)–chlorine process was applied to analyze its ability to remove MPs. The results showed that all 12 MPs were detected in both the influent and the reclaimed water, with the concentrations ranging from 25.5 to 238 ng/L and 8.6 to 42.5 ng/L, respectively. Over 52% of all the target MPs were readily degraded by the UV–chlorine process, and the removal efficiency was 7.7% to 64.2% higher than the corresponding removal efficiency by chlorination or UV irradiation only. The degradation efficiency increased with the increasing initial chlorine concentration. The pH value had a slight influence on the MP degradation and exhibited different trends for different MPs. The formation of known disinfectant byproducts (DBPs) during the UV–chlorine process was 33.8% to 68.4% of that in the chlorination process, but the DBPs’ formation potentials were 1.3 to 2.2 times higher. The toxicity assay indicated that UV–chlorine can effectively reduce the toxicity of reclaimed water. View Full-Text
Keywords: MPs; UV–chlorine process; disinfectant byproducts; toxicity MPs; UV–chlorine process; disinfectant byproducts; toxicity
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Wang, C.; Ying, Z.; Ma, M.; Huo, M.; Yang, W. Degradation of Micropollutants by UV–Chlorine Treatment in Reclaimed Water: pH Effects, Formation of Disinfectant Byproducts, and Toxicity Assay. Water 2019, 11, 2639.

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