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Article

Synergies within the Water-Energy-Food Nexus to Support the Integrated Urban Resources Governance

by 1,2, 1,2 and 1,2,*
1
School of Management Science and Engineering, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081, China
2
Center for Global Economy and Sustainable Development (CGESD), Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(11), 2365; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112365
Received: 30 August 2019 / Revised: 26 October 2019 / Accepted: 5 November 2019 / Published: 12 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insights on the Water–Energy–Food Nexus)
Rapid urbanization poses great challenges to water-energy-food nexus (WEF-Nexus) system, calling for integrative resources governance to improve the synergies between subsystems that constitute the Nexus. This paper explores the synergies within the WEF-Nexus in Shenzhen city while using the synergetic model. We first identify the order parameters and their causal paths in three subsystems and set several eigenvectors under each parameter. Secondly, a synergetic model is developed to calculate the synergy degree among parameters, and the synergetic networks are then further constructed. Centrality analysis on the synergetic networks reveals that the centralities of food subsystem perform the highest level while the water subsystem at the lowest level. Finally, we put forward some policy implications for cross-sectoral resources governance by embedding the synergy degree into causal paths. The results show that the synergies of the Nexus system in Shenzhen can be maximized by stabilizing water supply, coordinating the energy imports and exports, and reducing the crops sown areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: water-energy-food nexus; order parameter; synergy degree; resources governance; cross-sectoral cooperation water-energy-food nexus; order parameter; synergy degree; resources governance; cross-sectoral cooperation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, G.; Wang, Y.; Li, Y. Synergies within the Water-Energy-Food Nexus to Support the Integrated Urban Resources Governance. Water 2019, 11, 2365. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112365

AMA Style

Li G, Wang Y, Li Y. Synergies within the Water-Energy-Food Nexus to Support the Integrated Urban Resources Governance. Water. 2019; 11(11):2365. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112365

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Guijun, Yongsheng Wang, and Yulong Li. 2019. "Synergies within the Water-Energy-Food Nexus to Support the Integrated Urban Resources Governance" Water 11, no. 11: 2365. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11112365

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