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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Informal Settlements and Flooding: Identifying Strengths and Weaknesses in Local Governance for Water Management

1
Climate Service Center Germany (GERICS), Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, 20095 Hamburg, Germany
2
School of Built Environment and Development Studies, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban 4041, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2018, 10(7), 871; https://doi.org/10.3390/w10070871
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 27 June 2018 / Published: 29 June 2018
Urbanization and climate change are compounding the vulnerability of flooding for the urban poor, particularly in the Global South. However, local governance can be a greater determinant of flood risk than the hazard itself. Identifying strengths and weaknesses in local governance for water management is therefore crucial. This paper presents a governance assessment for Quarry Road West informal settlement, Durban, South Africa, in relation to flood risk by applying the Capital Approach Framework. Through developing a deeper understanding of the current governance system, the embeddedness of several social values can also be gauged. This is important particularly for integrative and transdisciplinary management of flood risk, enacted in the case of Quarry Road West informal settlement through the Palmiet Rehabilitation Project, a multi sector partnership at the climate change and water governance interface. Findings from this study indicate that, currently, climate change adaptation remains a challenge for decision-makers and policy-planners. A more effective integration of the residents of Quarry Road West informal settlement into local governance for water management is urgently needed. This is particularly important in the context of informal settlements that are marginalized and often lacking governance mechanisms to affect change. View Full-Text
Keywords: water governance; multi-sector partnerships; flooding; informal settlements water governance; multi-sector partnerships; flooding; informal settlements
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MDPI and ACS Style

Williams, D.S.; Máñez Costa, M.; Celliers, L.; Sutherland, C. Informal Settlements and Flooding: Identifying Strengths and Weaknesses in Local Governance for Water Management. Water 2018, 10, 871. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10070871

AMA Style

Williams DS, Máñez Costa M, Celliers L, Sutherland C. Informal Settlements and Flooding: Identifying Strengths and Weaknesses in Local Governance for Water Management. Water. 2018; 10(7):871. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10070871

Chicago/Turabian Style

Williams, David S.; Máñez Costa, María; Celliers, Louis; Sutherland, Catherine. 2018. "Informal Settlements and Flooding: Identifying Strengths and Weaknesses in Local Governance for Water Management" Water 10, no. 7: 871. https://doi.org/10.3390/w10070871

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