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Atmosphere 2018, 9(10), 395; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9100395

Re-Examination of the Decadal Change in the Relationship between the East Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean SST

1
Center for Climate Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Busan 46241, Korea
2
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan 46241, Korea
3
Laboratory for Regional Oceanography and Numerical Modeling, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, China
4
Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100875, China
5
College of Global Change and Earth System Science (GCESS), Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 August 2018 / Revised: 28 September 2018 / Accepted: 8 October 2018 / Published: 11 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monsoons)
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Abstract

This study examines the decadal change in the relationship between two major Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperature patterns, namely the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) and northern IO and the East Asia summer monsoon (EASM) in the early 2000s. In 1991–1999, the former epoch, the interannual variability of EASM was associated with the IOD-like pattern in the original paper and its relationship weakened in 2000–2016. There are two possible causes for this decadal change; stronger land-sea thermal contrast as a local forcing in latter epoch, which may result in the weakening of the relationship between the IO and the EASM. In addition, the influence of El Niño-southern Oscillation (ENSO) on the western North Pacific subtropical high (WNPSH) could be changed depending on the frequency of ENSO. In the 2000s, the intensity of the low frequency (LF)-type ENSO (42–86 months period) events was weaker compared to the former epoch but that of quasi-biennial (QB)-type ENSO (16–36 months period) remained persistent. This could explain that the QB-type ENSO is remote forcing that modulates the change in the relationship between the tropical IO patterns and EASM in the 2000s. View Full-Text
Keywords: East Asian summer monsoon; Indian ocean; decadal change; local forcing; remote forcing; transition of ENSO East Asian summer monsoon; Indian ocean; decadal change; local forcing; remote forcing; transition of ENSO
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Kim, S.; Ha, K.-J.; Ding, R.; Li, J. Re-Examination of the Decadal Change in the Relationship between the East Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean SST. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 395.

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