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Atmosphere 2018, 9(10), 381; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9100381

Emission and Cytotoxicity of Surgical Smoke: Cholesta-3,5-Diene Released from Pyrolysis of Prostate Tissue

1
Department of Environmental Engineering, Mokpo National University, Muan 58554, Korea
2
Department of Urology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju 54896, Korea
3
Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 54896, Korea
4
Biomedical Research Institute and Medical Device Clinical Trial Center, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju 54907, Korea
5
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, Korea
6
Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Mokpo National University, Muan 58554, Korea
7
School of Earth Sciences and Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 61005, Korea
8
Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan
9
Department of Environmental Engineering, Dong-Eui University, Busan 47340, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 July 2018 / Revised: 15 September 2018 / Accepted: 27 September 2018 / Published: 30 September 2018
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Abstract

Respiratory and lung irritants can be a by-product of the surgical pyrolysis of human tissues. Seven prostate tissues were collected during the transurethral resection of a prostate (TURP). Tissue samples, pyrolyzed in a pyrolysis sampling system, were collected and analyzed for the characterization of aerosols in the surgical smoke. In the pyrolyzed particulate matter (PM) from the TURP, Cholestra-3,5-diene was identified as the most dominant component along with 9-methylanthracene, hentriacontane, and dotriacontane based on the mass fragment structure determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). As a molecular marker, Cholesta-3,5-diene can be associated with a cytotoxic in primary human oral keratinocytes (HOK). In this research, the presence of Cholestra-3,5-diene is reported for the first time as a by-product of surgical pyrolysis. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic compounds; surgical aerosol; surgical carbonaceous material; toxicity; surgical smoke organic compounds; surgical aerosol; surgical carbonaceous material; toxicity; surgical smoke
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Bae, M.-S.; Park, J.K.; Kim, K.-H.; Cho, S.-S.; Lee, K.-Y.; Shon, Z.-H. Emission and Cytotoxicity of Surgical Smoke: Cholesta-3,5-Diene Released from Pyrolysis of Prostate Tissue. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 381.

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