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Article

Reproducibility of the Quantification of Reversible Wall Interactions in VOC Sampling Lines

Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino, Italy
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Stéphane Le Calvé
Atmosphere 2021, 12(2), 280; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020280
Received: 27 January 2021 / Revised: 11 February 2021 / Accepted: 12 February 2021 / Published: 20 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue VOC Sensing and Measurements)
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are widely measured at ppb and ppt level in many contexts, from therapeutic drug control in respiratory diseases to monitoring of climate change and indoor air quality. The need for accuracy is a common denominator in all these fields. The interactions between gas mixtures and solid surfaces in sampling lines and instruments play an important role in calculating the total uncertainty of the amount of VOC. The amount of substances in the gas mixture is affected by its reversible and irreversible interactions with the sampling line. The main aim of this paper is to propose and discuss a method to quantify the amount of substance segregated by reversible interactions on sampling lines. To validate the proposed method, the areic amount of a VOC (Acetone) is measured for a commercial test pipe (Sulfinert®) as the amount of substance per unit area of the internal surface of the test pipe segregated from the flowing gas mixture. Stainless steel coated by Sulfinert® was chosen as a test material because of its wide use and its limited irreversible and permeation effects. A certified gas mixture of Acetone in air with a nominal mole fraction of 10 µmol mol−1 was used for validation. Broad temperature control was used and the sensibility of the method to the temperature and the pressure has been evaluated to correct the bias due to physical condition. The sensitivity to the residence time and the Reynolds number of the gas flow has been evaluated to verify the reaching of equilibrium and the limits of the applicability of the method. The areic amount of Acetone at equilibrium on Sulfinert® coated pipe was measured as 40 nmol m−2, and an equilibrium constant value of around 0.2 m was calculated as the ratio between the superficial amount segregated on the wall and the amount concentration of Acetone in the mixture, both at the equilibrium. The observed reproducibility was better than 2.5%. This method is aimed to investigate VOC losses due to interactions for many VOC/material systems at a lower amount of substance levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: VOC measurements; surface interaction; gas sampling; acetone; Sulfinert®; equilibrium; uncertainty VOC measurements; surface interaction; gas sampling; acetone; Sulfinert®; equilibrium; uncertainty
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sassi, G.; Khan, B.A.; Lecuna, M. Reproducibility of the Quantification of Reversible Wall Interactions in VOC Sampling Lines. Atmosphere 2021, 12, 280. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020280

AMA Style

Sassi G, Khan BA, Lecuna M. Reproducibility of the Quantification of Reversible Wall Interactions in VOC Sampling Lines. Atmosphere. 2021; 12(2):280. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020280

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sassi, Guido, Bilal Alam Khan, and Maricarmen Lecuna. 2021. "Reproducibility of the Quantification of Reversible Wall Interactions in VOC Sampling Lines" Atmosphere 12, no. 2: 280. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020280

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