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Open AccessArticle

A Building-Block Urban Meteorological Observation Experiment (BBMEX) Campaign in Central Commercial Area in Seoul

1
Research Center for Atmospheric Environment, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 17035, Korea
2
Applied Meteorological Research Division, National Institute of Meteorological Sciences, Jeju 63568, Korea
3
High Impact Weather Research Center, National Institute of Meteorological Sciences, Gangneung 25457, Korea
4
Seoul Institute of Technology, Seoul 01811, Korea
5
Environment Business Dep., kt, Seoul 01811, Korea
6
Department of Atmospheric Science, Kongju National University, Gongju 314701, Korea
7
Observer, Seoul 01811, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(3), 299; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11030299
Received: 30 January 2020 / Revised: 17 March 2020 / Accepted: 17 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Meteorology)
High-resolution meteorological information is essential for attaining sustainable and resilient cities. To elucidate high-resolution features of surface and air temperatures in high-rise building blocks (BBs), a 3-dimensional BB meteorological observation experiment (BBMEX) campaign was designed. The campaign was carried out in a central commercial area in Seoul during a heat-wave event period (5−6 August) in 2019. Several types of fixed instrument were deployed, a mobile meteorological observation cart (MOCA) and a vehicle were operated periodically. The surface temperature was determined to be strongly dependent on the facial direction of a building, and sunlit or shade by surrounding obstacles. Considerable increases in surface temperature on the eastern facades of buildings before noon, on horizontal surfaces near noon, and on the western facades in the afternoon could provide more energy in BBs than over a flat surface. The air temperatures in the BB were higher than those at the Seoul station by 0.1−2.2 °C (1.1−1.9 °C) in daytime (night-time). The MOCA revealed that the surface and air temperatures in a BB could be affected by many complex factors, such as the structure of the BBs, shades, as well as the existence of facilities that mitigate heat stresses, such as ground fountains and waterways. View Full-Text
Keywords: BBMEX; building-block meteorology; heat wave; surface temperature; thermal infrared imager; tropical night BBMEX; building-block meteorology; heat wave; surface temperature; thermal infrared imager; tropical night
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Park, M.-S.; Byon, J.-Y.; Kim, B.-J.; Choi, W.; Myung, K.-M.; Lee, S.-H.; Cho, T.-I.; Chae, J.-H.; Min, J.-S.; Kang, M.; Jee, J.-B.; Kim, S.-H.; Cho, C.-R. A Building-Block Urban Meteorological Observation Experiment (BBMEX) Campaign in Central Commercial Area in Seoul. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 299.

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