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Article

The Role of Tropical Cyclones on the Total Precipitation in Cuba during the Hurricane Season from 1980 to 2016

1
Environmental Physics Laboratory (EPhysLab), CIM–UVigo, Universidade de Vigo, 32004 Ourense, Spain
2
Department of Meteorology, Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences, University of Havana, 10400 La Habana, Cuba
3
Instituto Dom Luiz, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, 1749–016 Campo Grande, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(11), 1156; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11111156
Received: 29 September 2020 / Revised: 19 October 2020 / Accepted: 22 October 2020 / Published: 26 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Central America and Caribbean Hydrometeorology and Hydroclimate)
This study quantifies the amount of rainfall supplied by tropical cyclones (TCs) to Cuba. It uses the long–term global gridded Multi–Source Weighted–Ensemble Precipitation (MSWEP) v2 data set, with a resolution of 0.1° in latitude and longitude, and a temporal resolution of 3 h during the hurricane seasons from 1980–2016. During this study period, 146 TCs were identified within a 500–km radius of Cuba. The contribution of TCs to the total precipitation over Cuba during the cyclonic season was ~11%. The maximum contribution occurs in October and November, representing 18% and 28% of the total precipitation, respectively. The interannual precipitation contribution shows a positive correlation (~0.74) with the number of TCs, but without a significant trend for the period. A climatological spatial analysis of the rainfall associated with TCs revealed great heterogeneity, although the major contribution was observed along the southern coast of the eastern and central provinces of Cuba, and in the western province of Pinar del Río. No significant difference was observed between the number of TCs that affected Cuba and their rainfall contribution under the positive and negative phases of the El Niño Southern Oscillation. However, the negative phase of the NAO led to an increase in the genesis of TCs that later affected Cuba, which led to a greater contribution to precipitation compared to that obtained from TCs during the positive phase of this oscillation. Our results also confirm that anomalous warmth of the tropical Atlantic Ocean, revealed through the Atlantic Meridional Mode, and enlargement of the Atlantic Warm Pool, enhances the genesis in the North Atlantic Basin of the TCs that affect Cuba, which was associated with an increase of the rainfall contribution to the total precipitation compared to that calculated for TCs formed during the opposite phases. View Full-Text
Keywords: tropical cyclones; rainfall contribution; teleconnection tropical cyclones; rainfall contribution; teleconnection
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fernández–Alvarez, J.C.; Sorí, R.; Pérez–Alarcón, A.; Nieto, R.; Gimeno, L. The Role of Tropical Cyclones on the Total Precipitation in Cuba during the Hurricane Season from 1980 to 2016. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 1156. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11111156

AMA Style

Fernández–Alvarez JC, Sorí R, Pérez–Alarcón A, Nieto R, Gimeno L. The Role of Tropical Cyclones on the Total Precipitation in Cuba during the Hurricane Season from 1980 to 2016. Atmosphere. 2020; 11(11):1156. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11111156

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fernández–Alvarez, José C., Rogert Sorí, Albenis Pérez–Alarcón, Raquel Nieto, and Luis Gimeno. 2020. "The Role of Tropical Cyclones on the Total Precipitation in Cuba during the Hurricane Season from 1980 to 2016" Atmosphere 11, no. 11: 1156. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11111156

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