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Open AccessArticle

Spatial Variability of Atmosphere Dust Fallout Flux in Urban–Industrial Environments

1
CERENA—Polo FEUP—Centre for Natural Resources and the Environment, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
2
Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(10), 1069; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101069
Received: 10 September 2020 / Revised: 1 October 2020 / Accepted: 2 October 2020 / Published: 8 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Air Quality)
This work aimed to assess and characterize the air quality in what concerns particulate pollution in urban–industrial environments. The main objectives were to study the spatial variability of the deposition flux of particulate pollution identifying areas with higher deposition and to associate the variability with climatological variables and with possible surrounding emitting sources. The method for collecting the deposited particles was based on the standard NF X 43–007. Sampling for particulate pollution took place between April 2015 and February 2016 through seven sampling campaigns. Maps of the spatial dispersion for the particulate pollution were obtained through statistics and geostatistics techniques. Elemental identification by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also used but only in two sampling campaigns. The results show that the sampling campaigns that took place during hot and dry periods, 2nd and 3rd, present higher deposition flux: 2.04 g/(m2 × month) and 1.72 g/(m2 × month), respectively. Lower deposition fluxes were registered in the 6th and 7th campaigns: 0.23 g/(m2 × month) and 0.24 g/(m2 × month), respectively. A recurrent high deposition was also observed at specific sampling points that may be due to both the nearby road traffic and the presence of chimneys. SEM analysis allowed to associate repetitive element deposition, at the same sampling point, to the same emitting source. View Full-Text
Keywords: particulate pollution; air quality; deposition flux; geostatistics; ordinary kriging; urban–industrial; elemental identification; electronic scanning microscopy particulate pollution; air quality; deposition flux; geostatistics; ordinary kriging; urban–industrial; elemental identification; electronic scanning microscopy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dinis, M.d.L.; Gonçalves, M.I. Spatial Variability of Atmosphere Dust Fallout Flux in Urban–Industrial Environments. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 1069. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101069

AMA Style

Dinis MdL, Gonçalves MI. Spatial Variability of Atmosphere Dust Fallout Flux in Urban–Industrial Environments. Atmosphere. 2020; 11(10):1069. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101069

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dinis, Maria d.L.; Gonçalves, Maria I. 2020. "Spatial Variability of Atmosphere Dust Fallout Flux in Urban–Industrial Environments" Atmosphere 11, no. 10: 1069. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101069

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