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Article

A Preliminary Spatial Analysis of the Association of Asthma and Traffic-Related Air Pollution in the Metropolitan Area of Calgary, Canada

1
Department of Geography, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
2
Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
3
Primary Health Care, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB T2W3N2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(10), 1066; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101066
Received: 4 September 2020 / Revised: 27 September 2020 / Accepted: 1 October 2020 / Published: 8 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Its Impacts on Human Health)
We performed a preliminary spatial analysis to assess the association of asthma emergency visits (AEV) with ambient air pollutants (NO2, PM2.5, PM10, Black Carbon, and VOCs) over Calgary, Canada. Descriptive analyses identify spatial patterns across the city. The spatial patterns of AEV and air pollutants were analyzed by descriptive and spatial statistics (Moran’s I and Getis G). The association between AEV, air pollutants, and socioeconomic status was assessed by correlation and regression. A spatial gradient was identified, characterized by increasing AEV incidence from west to east; this pattern has become increasingly pronounced over time. The association of asthma and air pollution is consistent with the location of industrial areas and major traffic corridors. AEV exhibited more significant associations with BTEX and PM10, particularly during the summer. Over time, AEV decreased overall, though with varying temporal patterns throughout Calgary. AEV exhibited significant and seasonal associations with ambient air pollutants. Socioeconomic status is a confounding factor in AEV in Calgary, and the AEV disparities across the city are becoming more pronounced over time. Within the current pandemic, this spatial analysis is relevant and timely, bearing potential to identify hotspots linked to ambient air pollution and populations at greater risk. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; asthma; spatial analysis; traffic-related air pollution; environmental health air pollution; asthma; spatial analysis; traffic-related air pollution; environmental health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bertazzon, S.; Calder-Bellamy, C.; Shahid, R.; Couloigner, I.; Wong, R. A Preliminary Spatial Analysis of the Association of Asthma and Traffic-Related Air Pollution in the Metropolitan Area of Calgary, Canada. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101066

AMA Style

Bertazzon S, Calder-Bellamy C, Shahid R, Couloigner I, Wong R. A Preliminary Spatial Analysis of the Association of Asthma and Traffic-Related Air Pollution in the Metropolitan Area of Calgary, Canada. Atmosphere. 2020; 11(10):1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101066

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bertazzon, Stefania, Caitlin Calder-Bellamy, Rizwan Shahid, Isabelle Couloigner, and Richard Wong. 2020. "A Preliminary Spatial Analysis of the Association of Asthma and Traffic-Related Air Pollution in the Metropolitan Area of Calgary, Canada" Atmosphere 11, no. 10: 1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101066

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