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Open AccessArticle

Adaption of an Evaporative Desert Cooler into a Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner: Experimental and Numerical Analysis

Department of Energy Engineering; German Jordanian University, Amman Madaba Street, P.O. Box 35247, Amman 11180, Jordan
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Atmosphere 2020, 11(1), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11010040
Received: 25 November 2019 / Revised: 20 December 2019 / Accepted: 25 December 2019 / Published: 28 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Thermal Comfort)
Desert coolers have attracted much attention as an alternative to mechanical air conditioning systems, as they are proving to be of lower initial cost and significantly lower operating cost. However, the uncontrolled increase in the moisture content of the supply air is still a great issue for indoor air quality and human thermal comfort concerns. This paper represents an experimental and numerical investigation of a modified desert air cooler into a liquid desiccant air conditioner (LDAC). An experimental setup was established to explore the supply air properties for an adapted commercial desert cooler. Several experiments were performed for air–water and air–desiccant as flow media, at several solutions to air mass ratios. Furthermore, the experimental results were compared with the result of a numerical simplified effectiveness model. The outcomes indicate a sharp reduction in the air humidity ratio by applying the desiccant solutions up to 5.57 g/kg and up to 4.15 g/kg, corresponding to dew point temperatures of 9.5 °C and 12.4 °C for LiCl and CaCl2, respectively. Additionally, the experimental and the numerical results concurred having shown the same pattern, with a maximal deviation of about 18% within the experimental uncertainties. View Full-Text
Keywords: desert cooler; evaporative cooling; indoor air quality; liquid desiccant; effectiveness model; moisture removal desert cooler; evaporative cooling; indoor air quality; liquid desiccant; effectiveness model; moisture removal
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Jaradat, M.; Al-Addous, M.; Albatayneh, A. Adaption of an Evaporative Desert Cooler into a Liquid Desiccant Air Conditioner: Experimental and Numerical Analysis. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 40.

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