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Open AccessArticle

Development and Implementation of a Platform for Public Information on Air Quality, Sensor Measurements, and Citizen Science

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands
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Atmosphere 2019, 10(8), 445; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10080445
Received: 29 June 2019 / Revised: 19 July 2019 / Accepted: 30 July 2019 / Published: 1 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Air Quality Assessment)
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Abstract

The use of low-cost sensors for air quality measurements is expanding rapidly, with an associated rise in the number of citizens measuring air quality themselves. This has major implications for traditional air quality monitoring as performed by Environmental Protection Agencies. Here we reflect on the experiences of the Dutch Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) with the use of low-cost sensors, particularly NO2 and PM10/PM2.5-sensors, and related citizen science, over the last few years. Specifically, we discuss the Dutch Innovation Program for Environmental Monitoring, which comprises the development of a knowledge portal and sensor data portal, new calibration approaches for sensors, and modelling and assimilation techniques for incorporating these uncertain sensor data into air pollution models. Finally, we highlight some of the challenges that come with the use of low-cost sensors for air quality monitoring, and give some specific use-case examples. Our results show that low-cost sensors can be a valuable addition to traditional air quality monitoring, but so far, their use in official monitoring has been limited. More research is needed to establish robust calibration methods while ongoing work is also aimed at a better understanding of the public’s needs for air quality information to optimize the use of low-cost sensors. View Full-Text
Keywords: air quality; low-cost sensors; citizen science; monitoring air quality; low-cost sensors; citizen science; monitoring
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Wesseling, J.; de Ruiter, H.; Blokhuis, C.; Drukker, D.; Weijers, E.; Volten, H.; Vonk, J.; Gast, L.; Voogt, M.; Zandveld, P.; van Ratingen, S.; Tielemans, E. Development and Implementation of a Platform for Public Information on Air Quality, Sensor Measurements, and Citizen Science. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 445.

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