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Sources and Geographical Origins of PM10 in Metz (France) Using Oxalate as a Marker of Secondary Organic Aerosols by Positive Matrix Factorization Analysis

1
Atmo Grand-Est, 5 rue de Madrid, 67300 Schiltigheim, France
2
Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et l’Environnement, CEA/Orme des Merisiers, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
3
Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte, France
4
Laboratoire Central de Surveillance de la Qualité de l’Air (LCSQA), 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte, France
5
Département Sciences de l’Atmosphère et Génie de l’Environnement-SAGE, IMT Lille Douai, Université de Lille, 59000 Lille, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070370
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 24 June 2019 / Accepted: 1 July 2019 / Published: 3 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Quality and Sources Apportionment)
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Abstract

An original source apportionment study was conducted on atmospheric particles (PM10) collected in Metz, one of the largest cities of Eastern France. A Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis was applied to a sampling filter-based chemical dataset obtained for the April 2015 to January 2017 period. Nine factors were clearly identified, showing mainly contributions from anthropogenic sources of primary PM (19.2% and 16.1% for traffic and biomass burning, respectively) as well as secondary aerosols (12.3%, 14.5%, 21.8% for sulfate-, nitrate-, and oxalate-rich factors, respectively). Wood-burning aerosols exhibited strong temporal variations and contributed up to 30% of the PM mass fraction during winter, while primary traffic concentrations remained relatively constant throughout the year. These two sources are also the main contributors during observed PM10 pollution episodes. Furthermore, the dominance of the oxalate-rich factor among other secondary aerosol factors underlines the role of atmospheric processing to secondary organic aerosol loadings which are still poorly characterized in this region. Finally, Concentration-Weighted Trajectory (CWT) analysis were performed to investigate the geographical origins of the apportioned sources, notably illustrating a significant transport of both nitrate-rich and sulfate-rich factors from Northeastern Europe but also from the Balkan region. View Full-Text
Keywords: receptor modelling; positive matrix factorization; trajectory analysis; oxalate; secondary organic aerosols receptor modelling; positive matrix factorization; trajectory analysis; oxalate; secondary organic aerosols
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Petit, J.-E.; Pallarès, C.; Favez, O.; Alleman, L.Y.; Bonnaire, N.; Rivière, E. Sources and Geographical Origins of PM10 in Metz (France) Using Oxalate as a Marker of Secondary Organic Aerosols by Positive Matrix Factorization Analysis. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 370.

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